Definición de disgrace en inglés:

disgrace

Saltos de línea: dis|grace
Pronunciación: /dɪsˈgreɪs
 
/

sustantivo

[mass noun]
1Loss of reputation or respect as the result of a dishonourable action: he left the army in disgrace if he’d gone back it would have brought disgrace on the family
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • The family guilty of such an omission would be held in disgrace and contempt pending the intervention of lineage or clan members.
  • It is usually only when an element of criminal dishonesty is involved that there follows a removal, in disgrace, from Westminster.
  • He was in disgrace in 1552 and degraded from the Garter, but restored to favour by Mary, whom he served as lord privy seal.
Sinónimos
dishonour, shame, ignominy, discredit, degradation, disrepute, ill-repute, infamy, scandal, stigma, odium, opprobrium, obloquy, condemnation, vilification, contempt, disrespect, disapproval, disfavour, disapprobation; humiliation, embarrassment, loss of face; Australianstrifeout of favour, unpopular, in bad odour
informal in someone's bad/black books, in the doghouse
New Zealand informal in the dogbox
1.1 [in singular] A person or thing regarded as shameful and unacceptable: he’s a disgrace to the legal profession
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • It is hateful, shameful and a disgrace to all when it is used unintelligently.
  • It's a disgrace to any concept of fairness, an insult to a horrible past, encouragement to a disgraceful present and in the long run it damages everyone.
  • Our exclusion is a scandal and a disgrace to the local Council.
Sinónimos
scandal, outrage, source of shame; discredit, reproach, affront, insult; bad reflection on, stain on, blemish on, blot on, blot on the escutcheon of, black mark on; stigma, brand; black sheep
informal crime, sin
literary smirch on

verbo

[with object] Volver al principio  
1Bring shame or discredit on: you have disgraced the family name John stiffened his jaw so he wouldn’t disgrace himself by crying
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • ‘I do not intend to disgrace myself at the end of my career,’ he said.
  • Tomorrow begins with a nine o'clock class, so I hope I shan't disgrace myself, time-wise, there.
  • She didn't disgrace herself and managed to keep with them for much of the race only to fade slightly at the end.
Sinónimos
bring shame on, shame, dishonour, discredit, bring into disrepute, degrade, debase, defame, stigmatize, taint, sully, tarnish, besmirch, stain, blacken, drag through the mud/mire, give a bad name to, put in a bad light, reflect badly on
literary smirch, besmear
archaic spot
1.1Cause (someone) to fall from favour or a position of power or honour: he has been publicly disgraced for offences for which he was not guilty
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • We see it regularly now when prominent figures fall foul of the law or when disgraced business leaders transgress the code and pay the price.
  • He was disgraced in 1999 after he tested positive for drugs at the Pan-American games.
  • Two disgraced employees recount how their lives were ruined when they stole from their employers.
Sinónimos
discredit, dishonour, defame, disparage, stigmatize, reproach, censure, blame; humiliate, mortify, embarrass, cause to lose face, chasten, humble, demean, put someone in their place, take down a peg or two, cut down to size, show up
North American informal make someone eat crow
US informal own
discredited, shamed, humiliated, in disgrace, under a cloud, brought into disrepute

Origen

mid 16th century (as a verb): via French from Italian disgrazia (noun), disgraziare (verb), from dis- (expressing reversal) + Latin gratia 'grace'.

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