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evoke

Saltos de línea: evoke
Pronunciación: /ɪˈvəʊk
 
/

Definición de evoke en inglés:

verbo

[with object]
1Bring or recall (a feeling, memory, or image) to the conscious mind: the sight evoked pleasant memories of his childhood
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • I really need to jog my memory to evoke images of the place.
  • Words are flashing in my mind, recollections of a time past, evoking specific feelings, recalling certain events, ones I do not wish to recollect.
  • What's to say there's not a homeless soul on a cold Dublin street who occasionally glances at a digital photo - using the memories evoked by the image to hold onto reality for yet another day.
1.1Elicit (a response): the Green Paper evoked critical reactions from various bodies
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Stress related factors might also influence interpretations of abuse, and evoke different responses in the victims of abuse.
  • In subjects with reduced androgen levels, stimuli that normally evoke a stress response are significantly less potent.
  • Stalking, once established as a social problem, evoked a rapid response from the criminal justice system.
2Invoke (a spirit or deity): Akasha is evoked in India when a house is being built to ensure its completion
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • To evoke the Deities, raise the clasped hands to the center of the forehead.
  • Note that if you do choose to evoke the deity, you will enter a Gnostic trance and you may therefore forget what happened while you were under the trance.
  • Every year at Beltane the High Priestess evoked the goddess and all prayed to her for prosperous times in the coming harvest.

Origen

early 17th century (in sense 2): from Latin evocare, from e- (variant of ex-) 'out of, from' + vocare 'to call'.

More
  • voice from (Middle English):

    A word derived from Latin vox ‘voice’ and is related to vocabulary (mid 16th century), vocal (Middle English), vocation (Late Middle English), and vociferous (early 17th century), while the verb vocare ‘to call’ appears in convoke (late 16th century) ‘call together’; equivocate (Late Middle English) literally ‘call by the same name’; evoke (early 17th century) ‘call out’; invoke (Late Middle English) ‘call upon’; provoke (Late Middle English) ‘call forth’; revoke (Late Middle English) ‘call back’; and vouch (Middle English) and voucher (early 16th century). Vowel (Middle English) is from Old French vouel, from Latin vocalis (littera) ‘vocal (letter)’. The Latin root survives in vox pop, ‘an informal survey of people's opinion’, which is short for Latin vox populi or ‘voice of the people’. When people refer to an ignored advocate of reform as a voice in the wilderness they are echoing the words of John the Baptist proclaiming the coming of the Messiah: ‘I am the voice of one crying in the wilderness.’

Derivados

evoker

1
sustantivo
Example sentences
  • We like certain old cars because we find them aesthetically satisfying and sometimes very beautiful, historically interesting and often powerful evokers of youthful passions.
  • Coleman notes the ‘ritualization’ of repetitive language in Wideman's black idiom and traces that use of language to ‘its nonlinear function as evoker of the timeless qualities and values of the black community’.

Definición de evoke en:

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Palabra del día terpsichorean
Pronunciación: ˌtəːpsɪkəˈriːən
adjective
relating to dancing