Definición de falcon en inglés:

falcon

Saltos de línea: fal¦con
Pronunciación: /ˈfɔː(l)k(ə)n
 
, ˈfɒlk(ə)n
 
/

sustantivo

1A diurnal bird of prey with long pointed wings and a notched beak, typically catching prey by diving on it from above. Compare with hawk1 (sense 1) of the noun).
  • Family Falconidae, in particular the genus Falco: many species, including the peregrine, hobby, merlin, and kestrel
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Pete takes us inside the lives and minds of all thirty-four species of diurnal raptors found in North America - hawks, falcons, eagles, vultures, the osprey and the harrier.
  • The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds estimates that around 100 birds of prey, including eagles, falcons and hen harriers, are either poisoned, shot, trapped or have their nests destroyed every year on the Scottish moors.
  • Hawks, harriers, falcons, eagles, and vultures are diurnal migrants.
1.1 Falconry A female falcon, especially a peregrine. Compare with tercel.
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • The falcon, although unhooded, perches, docile and still on the edge of a table.

Origen

Middle English faucon (originally denoting any diurnal bird of prey used in falconry): from Old French, from late Latin falco, from Latin falx, falc- 'sickle', or of Germanic origin and related to Dutch valk and German Falke. The -l- was added in the 15th century to conform with the Latin spelling.

Definición de falcon en:

Obtener más de Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribirse para eliminar anuncios y acceder a los recursos premium

Palabra del día setose
Pronunciación: ˈsiːtəʊs
adjective
bearing bristles or setae; bristly