Hay 2 definiciones de fawn en inglés:

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fawn1

Saltos de línea: fawn
Pronunciación: /fɔːn
 
/

sustantivo

1A young deer in its first year: a six-month-old roe fawn
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • There is also the loss of wild life, especially deer and their young fawns who graze high on the mountain slope and shelter in the forestry.
  • Of course the original snowdoll melted in the end, and also some of the younger deer - fawns - used to lick it, which didn't help, but there you go.
  • Most of their predation of deer is on fawns, although several members of a pack could bring down an adult.
2 [mass noun] A light brown colour: soft shades of pale green and fawn [as modifier]: a fawn dress
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • They are the descendants of an ancient population of fawn or brown coloured cattle which originally came from Asia.
  • Foliage dwellers vary in colour from fawn to brown or bright green.
  • Eye-witness reports suggest the plane was a high-wing single engine aircraft, fawn coloured and brown underneath.
Sinónimos
beige, yellowish-brown, pale brown, buff, sand, sandy, oatmeal, wheaten, biscuit, café au lait, camel, kasha, ecru, taupe, stone, stone-coloured, greige, greyish-brown, mushroom, putty;
neutral, natural, naturelle

verbo

[no object] Volver al principio  
(Of a deer) produce young: the forest was closed for hunting when the does were fawning

Origen

late Middle English: from Old French faon, based on Latin fetus 'offspring'; compare with fetus.

More
  • faun from (Late Middle English):

    In Roman mythology a faun was a lustful rural deity represented as a man with goat's horns, ears, legs, and tail. The word comes from the name of Faunus, a god of flocks and herds, who was associated with wooded places. He had a sister, Fauna, whose name in turn gives us fauna, which since the late 18th century has been used to mean ‘the animals of a particular region or period’. Flora (late 18th century), ‘the plants of a particular region or period’ comes from the name of Flora, an ancient Italian goddess of fertility and flowers, source also of floral (mid 18th century), floret (late 17th century), florid (mid 17th century), and florist (early 17th century). See also flower.

    The identically sounded fawn (Late Middle English) meaning ‘a young deer’ comes from Old French faon and is based on Latin fetus ‘offspring’. The word did not mean ‘a light brown colour’ until much later, in the late 19th century. The verb fawn is earlier, and is a quite different word. In Old English fagnian meant ‘make or be glad’, often used of a dog showing delight by wagging its tail, grovelling, or whining. Fawn was then used to convey the idea of a person giving a servile display of exaggerated flattery or affection, particularly in order to gain favour.

Frases

in fawn

1
(Of a deer) pregnant.

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Hay 2 definiciones de fawn en inglés:

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fawn2

Saltos de línea: fawn
Pronunciación: /fɔːn
 
/

verbo

[no object]
1(Of a person) give a servile display of exaggerated flattery or affection, typically in order to gain favour: congressmen fawn over the President
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Are there any musicians that you would fawn over if you had the chance?
  • If you loved him before, you'll probably fawn over this picture.
  • Just because all the girls fawn over you doesn't mean you're that good-looking.
Sinónimos
be obsequious to, be sycophantic to, be servile to, curry favour with, pay court to, play up to, crawl to, creep to, ingratiate oneself with, dance attendance on, fall over oneself for, kowtow to, toady to, truckle to, bow and scrape before, grovel before, cringe before, abase oneself before;
flatter, praise, sing the praises of, praise to the skies, praise to excess, eulogize
informal sweet-talk, soft-soap, suck up to, make up to, smarm around, be all over, fall all over, butter up, lick someone's boots, rub up the right way, lay it on thick, lay it on with a trowel
Australian/New Zealand informal smoodge to
vulgar slang kiss someone's arse
obsequious, servile, sycophantic, flattering, ingratiating, unctuous, oleaginous, oily, toadyish, slavish, bowing and scraping, grovelling, abject, crawling, creeping, cringing, prostrate, Uriah Heepish
North American informal brown-nosing
British vulgar slang arse-kissing, bum-sucking
North American vulgar slang kiss-ass, ass-kissing, suckholing
1.1(Of a dog) show slavish devotion, especially by rubbing against someone: the dogs started fawning on me

Origen

Old English fagnian 'make or be glad', of Germanic origin; related to fain.

More
  • faun from (Late Middle English):

    In Roman mythology a faun was a lustful rural deity represented as a man with goat's horns, ears, legs, and tail. The word comes from the name of Faunus, a god of flocks and herds, who was associated with wooded places. He had a sister, Fauna, whose name in turn gives us fauna, which since the late 18th century has been used to mean ‘the animals of a particular region or period’. Flora (late 18th century), ‘the plants of a particular region or period’ comes from the name of Flora, an ancient Italian goddess of fertility and flowers, source also of floral (mid 18th century), floret (late 17th century), florid (mid 17th century), and florist (early 17th century). See also flower.

    The identically sounded fawn (Late Middle English) meaning ‘a young deer’ comes from Old French faon and is based on Latin fetus ‘offspring’. The word did not mean ‘a light brown colour’ until much later, in the late 19th century. The verb fawn is earlier, and is a quite different word. In Old English fagnian meant ‘make or be glad’, often used of a dog showing delight by wagging its tail, grovelling, or whining. Fawn was then used to convey the idea of a person giving a servile display of exaggerated flattery or affection, particularly in order to gain favour.

Definición de fawn en:

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