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garner

Saltos de línea: gar¦ner
Pronunciación: /ˈɡɑːnə
 
/

Definición de garner en inglés:

verbo

[with object]
1Gather or collect (something, especially information or approval): the police struggled to garner sufficient evidence
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • The idea of informers and agents is to garner information to save lives.
  • He said information garnered by the expert would be used to help police complete a full facial reconstruction.
  • The prosecutor's office chose to ignore the fact that both of them used the equipment to garner information that by any stretch of the imagination is of great public interest in fighting corruption.
Sinónimos
1.1 archaic Store; deposit: the crop was ready to be reaped and garnered
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • The plot has to be ploughed and partitioned, watered and made ready for the sowing; and then the sprouts have to be fostered and guarded into maturity until the crop ripens and can be collected and garnered in the granary.
  • From a certain time in September it suddenly-in fact quite discontinuously- starts to rise, probably remains at a high level for some weeks, and gradually declines, reaching zero towards the end of October, when potatoes have been picked and garnered.

sustantivo

archaic Volver al principio  
A granary.
Example sentences
  • The upper floor also contains garners for storing unmalted and malted grain.

Origen

Middle English (originally as a noun): from Old French gernier, from Latin granarium 'granary', from granum 'grain'.

More
  • grain from (Middle English):

    The first meaning of grain, which is from Latin granum ‘seed’, also found in granary (late 16th century), granule (mid 17th century), and granite (mid 17th century) with its grain-like markings was, a single seed of a plant. From this developed the idea not only of a seed-like particle such as a grain of sand, salt, or gold but also of an arrangement of fibres that resembles small seeds or grains side by side, such as the ‘grain’ of a piece of wood. If something goes against the grain it is contrary to your natural inclination. This, dating from the mid 17th century, comes from carpentry. While grange is used today for a country house it was originally a barn for grain and comes from medieval Latin granica (villa) ‘grain house’, based on granum. Garner (Middle English) was originally also a word for a granary, and comes via French from the same source.

Definición de garner en:

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Pronunciación: ˈɛmjʊləs
adjective
seeking to emulate someone or something