Hay 2 definiciones de loo en inglés:

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loo1

Saltos de línea: loo

sustantivo

British informal
A toilet: [as modifier]: loo paper
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • The second option was to cut services: scale back dustbin emptying, close more public loos or stop sweeping the streets, for instance.
  • There are far too few accessible public loos in our town centres and the one in the car park is the only reliable convenience with a reasonable standard of cleanliness.
  • He feared there was a Government agenda to pension off public loos because councils did not have a duty to provide them, and closure kept council tax bills down.

Origen

1940s: many theories have been put forward about the word's origin: one suggests the source is Waterloo, a trade name for iron cisterns in the early part of the century; the evidence remains inconclusive.

More
  • The upper-class author Nancy Mitford first put loo, meaning ‘lavatory’, into print in her 1940 novel Pigeon Pie. People have put forward different theories about its origin, but none is conclusive. Perhaps the most plausible suggests the source as Waterloo, a trade name for iron cisterns in the early 20th century. A popular but unlikely one, not least because of their relative dates, refers it to gardyloo, a cry used in 18th-century Edinburgh to warn passers-by that someone was about to throw slops out of a window into the street. It is based on pseudo-French gar de l'eau ‘mind the water’ (real French would be gare l'eau). Another French phrase is behind a third suggestion, that British servicemen in France during the First World War picked up lieux d'aisances ‘places of ease’, used for ‘a lavatory’.

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Hay 2 definiciones de loo en inglés:

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loo2

Saltos de línea: loo

sustantivo

[mass noun]
A gambling card game, popular from the 17th to the 19th centuries, in which a player who fails to win a trick must pay a sum to a pool.

Origen

late 17th century: abbreviation of obsolete lanterloo from French lanturlu, a meaningless song refrain.

More
  • The upper-class author Nancy Mitford first put loo, meaning ‘lavatory’, into print in her 1940 novel Pigeon Pie. People have put forward different theories about its origin, but none is conclusive. Perhaps the most plausible suggests the source as Waterloo, a trade name for iron cisterns in the early 20th century. A popular but unlikely one, not least because of their relative dates, refers it to gardyloo, a cry used in 18th-century Edinburgh to warn passers-by that someone was about to throw slops out of a window into the street. It is based on pseudo-French gar de l'eau ‘mind the water’ (real French would be gare l'eau). Another French phrase is behind a third suggestion, that British servicemen in France during the First World War picked up lieux d'aisances ‘places of ease’, used for ‘a lavatory’.

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