Hay 3 definiciones de march en inglés:

march1

Saltos de línea: march
Pronunciación: /mɑːtʃ
 
/

verbo

[no object, usually with adverbial of direction]
1Walk in a military manner with a regular measured tread: thousands marched behind the coffin
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Thousands of soldiers were walking around, marching, much like in the present day military manner.
  • Volunteers from this military body now marched to Carthage and stormed the jail.
  • Tens of thousands marched with Spartacus, and a succession of Roman armies were crushed.
Sinónimos
stride, walk, troop, step, pace, tread; footslog, slog, tramp, hike, trudge; parade, file, process, promenade
British informal yomp
1.1Walk quickly and with determination: without a word she marched from the room
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • We were approximately sixty yards from the front door - the main entrance when a woman was coming towards - she was marching very quickly towards us.
  • I exited the elevator quickly, marching out to the crowded street.
  • She quickly turned and began marching towards her apartment building, now only a block away.
Sinónimos
stalk, strut, stride, flounce, storm, stomp, sweep, swagger
1.2 [with object and adverbial of direction] Force (someone) to walk somewhere quickly: she gripped Rachel’s arm and marched her through the door
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • He took her firmly by the arm and marched her to off toward the command deck.
  • When he was asked to hand it back, he told the victim he would only do so in return for money and marched him to a cash point machine where he was forced to withdraw money before handing it back.
  • He then marched her to a bank and forced her to withdraw 500 from her savings.
1.3Walk along public roads in an organized procession as a form of protest: unemployed workers marched from Jarrow to London they planned to march on Baton Rouge
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Tuesday Scotland's farmers march on Holyrood to protest against the blows which have beset their profession.
  • Conservative leader William Hague today urged sub-postmasters to march on London for a rally against the threat to their businesses.
  • The protestors originally attempted to march on the US Embassy but heavily-armed police blocked their way.
1.4(Of something abstract) proceed or advance inexorably: time marches on
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • We all sit here, watching and trying to make sense of it all, as Time marches by inexorably…
  • Huygens' ground track marches inexorably to the east, though the descent is now getting much steeper.
  • Spillover would ensure that political elites marched inexorably towards the promotion of integration.
Sinónimos
move forward, advance, progress, forge ahead, make headway, go on, continue on, roll on, develop, evolve

sustantivo

Volver al principio  
1An act or instance of marching: the relieving force was more than a day’s march away
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • They aim to reach the Pole in 65 days, by which time they will have covered twice the distance trekked by Hadow in his march to the North Pole.
  • For instance, as they begin their march, the mood in the army of Shalya, one of the first to start to join the war, is one of celebration.
  • The afternoon's celebrations included a march down to the ferry launching site, the walking group led by piper Bill Jackson.
Sinónimos
1.1A piece of music composed to accompany marching or with a rhythm suggestive of marching: he began to hum a funeral march
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • In the second movement - the funeral march - musical iconography impinges on performance.
  • Funeral marches abound in Mahler, and they don't always mean literal death.
  • With their use of tone rows and dense counterpoint these pieces should dispel any ideas that Ives's music is just about jaunty marches and musical borrowings.
1.2A procession organized as a protest: a protest march
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • He was also involved in the policing of presidential and Royal visits, marches and sectarian rioting.
  • The curtains flapping from the broken windows led to rumours of white flags and peace marches.
  • At one point, the film follows several of the tour's dancers watching a march by the AIDS activist group ACT UP.
Sinónimos
parade, procession, march past, promenade, cortège; demonstration, protest
informal demo
Indianmorcha
1.3 [in singular] The steady and inevitable development or progress of something: the march of history
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • It understands rile future not as simply a repetition of today or as the inevitable march of progress.
  • This information was celebrated by the media as the inevitable forward march of progress.
  • As the march of history progresses, however, traditions change.
Sinónimos
progress, advance, progression, passage, continuance, development, evolution, headway

Origen

late Middle English: from French marcher 'to walk' (earlier 'to trample'), of uncertain origin.

Frases

march to (the beat of) a different tune (or drummer)

informal Consciously adopt a different approach or attitude to the majority of people: he has always marched to a different tune but this time his perversity may be his undoing
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Now Michael Deaver authors a personal portrait of the former president he says has always marched to a different drummer.
  • Admiral Rickover, Peter Drucker, and Georges Doriot always marched to a different drummer and got the acclaim of the crowd.
  • Lennon is believed to favour a return to Congress and is viewed as a moderate, but the overwhelming message from the conference of over 400 delegates was that the general secretary is marching to a different tune from his troops.

on the march

Marching: the army was on the march at last
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • It is a stunning, impressive picture that captures the movement of an army on the march, as well as the brooding conditions they face almost as an active element in the conflict.
  • The pressure of that blank metal stare chilled Martel's soul, as if he were watching distant, marauding armies on the march.
  • The Kingdom of Jerusalem still hung by a thread and armies were on the march that spring.
Making progress: United are on the march again
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Partick Thistle are joint top of the Second Division just behind Clydebank on goal difference and John Lambie is convincing friend and foe alike that the Firhill side are on the march once more.
  • This time last year, when Celtic were engaged in a heroic, though ultimately futile, Champions League campaign, O'Neill's reputation was on the march.
  • But the gospel according to Mel betrays a peculiarly unsophisticated take on the key event in the Christian tradition, and casts doubt on the idea that religion is on the march.

Definición de march en:

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Palabra del día humoresque
Pronunciación: ˌhjuːməˈrɛsk
noun
a short, lively piece of music

Hay 3 definiciones de march en inglés:

march2

Saltos de línea: march
Pronunciación: /mɑːtʃ
 
/

sustantivo

1 (Marches) An area of land on the border between two countries or territories, especially between England and Wales or (formerly) England and Scotland: the Welsh Marches
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • This border region, the Marches, is a stretch of pasture-land much broken by hills, woods, and twisting rivers.
  • Upon the death of Walter de Lacy in 1241 his two granddaughters became heiresses to his lands and lordships in England, the Welsh Marches, and Ireland.
  • Educated at Shrewsbury (his father being lord president of the Council in the Marches of Wales) and at Christ Church, Oxford, he was devoted to study.
Sinónimos
1.1 (the Marches) dated English name for Marche.

verbo

[no object] (march with) Volver al principio  
(Of a country, territory, or estate) have a common frontier with: his estate marches with yours

Origen

Middle English: from Old French marche (noun), marchir (verb), of Germanic origin; related to mark1.

Definición de march en:

Hay 3 definiciones de march en inglés:

March3

Saltos de línea: March
Pronunciación: /mɑːtʃ
 
/

sustantivo

The third month of the year, in the northern hemisphere usually considered the first month of spring: the work was completed in March [as modifier]: the March issue of the magazine
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Waiting times are to be cut to six months by March and just three months the following year.
  • I gave quite a detailed explanation of pension credit in my column in the March issue.
  • By March last year almost every city and many small towns had set up local coalitions.

Origen

Middle English: from an Old French dialect variant of marz, from Latin Martius (mensis) '(month) of Mars'.

Definición de march en: