Definición de margrave en inglés:

margrave

Saltos de línea: mar|grave
Pronunciación: /ˈmɑːɡreɪv
 
/

sustantivo

historical
The hereditary title of some princes of the Holy Roman Empire.
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Long after Charlemagne, and even long after the Middle Ages, there were lords in Germany called margraves, still reflecting the administrative inheritance from the early Middle Ages.
  • It is true that mormaers are found inland, but an analogy may be made with Carolingian border officials ‘margrave’ and ‘marquis’ which became titles for members of the nobility far away from a frontier.
  • In order for his margraves, especially, to rule the conquered peoples, Charlemagne had their customs set down in writing.

Origen

mid 16th century, from Middle Dutch markgrave 'count of a border territory', from marke 'boundary' + grave 'count'.

Derivativos

margravate

Pronunciación: /ˈmɑːɡrəvət/
sustantivo
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Any road to Austria would have to cross the Rhön mountains and a myriad of tiny margravates and bishoprics, then continue through the Bavarian forests until it reached the border.
  • Although it would remain under Bohemian control for most, but not all, of the next several centuries, Moravia was actually run as a separate margravate, usually under the control of a younger son of the Bohemian ruler.
  • Although Moravia had lost its primacy to Bohemia in the 10th century, becoming a margravate in 1029, it maintained separate musical interests.

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Palabra del día impudicity
Pronunciación: ˌɪmpjʊˈdɪsɪti
noun
lack of modesty