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marguerite

Saltos de línea: mar|guer¦ite
Pronunciación: /ˌmɑːɡəˈriːt
 
/

Definición de marguerite en inglés:

sustantivo

Another term for ox-eye daisy.
Example sentences
  • The parks superintendent began his job of supervising the distribution of hundreds of geraniums, ivy geraniums, marguerites, petunias, trailing lobelia, anthericum and salvia, a job which would be completed well before the festival.
  • Lavender, rosemary and thyme gathered in thick clumps under the windows, with poinsettias, passionflower, marigolds, marguerites and hollyhocks growing wild in the borders.
  • The strange flower is caused by a form of fasciation, a common condition that produces wide, flattened stems on a large range of plants including sedums, tomatoes and marguerites.

Origen

early 17th century: French equivalent of the given name Margaret.

More
  • pearl from (Late Middle English):

    Pearl is from Old French perle and may be based on Latin perna ‘leg’, extended to mean a leg-of-mutton-shaped water mussel (mentioned by Pliny). The Romans greatly prized fresh-water pearls, Britain's reputation as a good source of pearls being one of the motives behind their invasion. Matthew 7:6 has provided a common idiomatic expression: ‘Neither cast ye your pearls before swine’. In Romance languages the usual word for pearl comes via Latin, from Greek margeron, possibly from some Eastern language. The word became marguerite in French, which was also used for a variety of daisy-like flowers, because they are pearly white. The word was adopted into English in the early 17th century. This is also the source of the name Margaret.

Definición de marguerite en:

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Palabra del día terpsichorean
Pronunciación: ˌtəːpsɪkəˈriːən
adjective
relating to dancing