Hay 3 definiciones de Maroon en inglés:

Maroon

Saltos de línea: Ma¦roon
Pronunciación: /məˈruːn
 
/

sustantivo

  • A member of any of various communities in parts of the Caribbean who were originally descended from escaped slaves. In the 18th century Jamaican Maroons fought two wars against the British, both of which ended with treaties affirming the independence of the Maroons.
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • Nanny was the greatest of the generals of the Maroons, runaway slaves who forged a society and an identity in the weedy-thick hill country of the Jamaican hinterland.
    • By 1770, five thousand to six thousand Maroons or runaway slaves were living in the jungle.
    • Many of the Maroons (who are descended from escaped black African slaves) have more than one wife.

Origen

mid 17th century: from French marron 'feral', from Spanish cimarrón 'wild', (as a noun) 'runaway slave'.

Más definiciones de Maroon 

Definición de Maroon en: 

Obtener más de Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribirse para eliminar anuncios y acceder a los recursos premium

Palabra del día mage
Pronunciación: meɪdʒ
noun
a magician or learned person

Hay 3 definiciones de Maroon en inglés:

maroon1

Saltos de línea: ma¦roon
Pronunciación: /məˈruːn
 
/

adjetivo

  • Of a brownish-red colour: ornate maroon and gold wallpaper
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • Besides the regular reddish maroon colour, there are cream pastes to leave pink, blue, violet, magenta designs on the skin.
    • At the right was a living room covered with maroon wallpaper and gold moon and stars.
    • The wrap colors include a multi blue, black, white, red, turquoise, purple, jade green, navy blue, gold and a maroon type of color.

sustantivo

Volver al principio  
  • 1 [mass noun] A brownish-red colour: the hat is available in either white or maroon [count noun]: cold pinks, purples, and maroons
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • The schools new colours are maroon, royal blue and yellow.
    • They come with many different leaf colours, from maroon and cream, to copper and lime, usually with interesting variegations.
    • Last Sunday was officially declared a day of no rest in Ballinrobe, as local painters and decorators coloured the town in maroon and yellow.
  • 2chiefly British A firework that makes a loud bang, used as a signal or warning.
    [ early 19th century: so named because the firework makes the noise of a chestnut (see below) bursting in the fire]
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • For years the start and end of the two minutes silence across the town has been signalled by the firing of a maroon - a firework-like device that produces a deafening boom.
    • Celebrations start at midday, with the firing of a maroon to signal the beginning of the party.
    • A countdown led by the Wales Tourist Board chairman, a coastguard maroon and one of the loudest fireworks that the fireworks company could muster, sent the swim on its way.

Origen

late 17th century (in the sense 'chestnut'): from French marron 'chestnut', via Italian from medieval Greek maraon. The sense relating to colour dates from the late 18th century.

Más definiciones de Maroon 

Definición de maroon en: 

Hay 3 definiciones de Maroon en inglés:

maroon2

Saltos de línea: ma¦roon
Pronunciación: /məˈruːn
 
/

verbo

[with object]

Origen

early 18th century: from Maroon, originally in the form marooned 'lost in the wilds'.

Más definiciones de Maroon 

Definición de maroon en: