Hay 2 definiciones de mood en inglés:

mood1

Saltos de línea: mood
Pronunciación: /muːd
 
/

sustantivo

Frases

in the (or in no) mood for/to do something

Feeling (or not feeling) like doing or experiencing something: she was in no mood for sightseeing
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Lieutenant Nemeck was not in a good mood, and in no mood to be made fun of by a junior.
  • I was in no mood to pursue the issue but the experience did leave a bad taste in my mouth.
  • Laura scowled, this banter could go on for hours, and tonight she was in no mood for it, handling Ryan was enough for the time being.

Origen

Old English mōd (also in the senses 'mind' and 'fierce courage'), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch moed and German Mut.

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Palabra del día skosh
Pronunciación: skəʊʃ
noun
a small amount; a little

Hay 2 definiciones de mood en inglés:

mood2

Saltos de línea: mood
Pronunciación: /muːd
 
/

sustantivo

  • 1 Grammar A category or form which indicates whether a verb expresses fact (indicative mood), command (imperative mood), question (interrogative mood), wish (optative mood), or conditionality (subjunctive mood).
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • French also has the option of the embedded clause appearing in the subjunctive mood.
    • He wants to move the claim from the conditional to the indicative mood, as the grammarians would say.
    • But the key point here is that it's the subjunctive mood, not the subjunctive case.
  • 2 Logic Any of the valid forms into which each of the figures of a categorical syllogism may occur.

Origen

mid 16th century: variant of mode, influenced by mood1.

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