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pleat

Saltos de línea: pleat
Pronunciación: /pliːt
 
/

Definición de pleat en inglés:

sustantivo

A double or multiple fold in a garment or other item made of cloth, held by stitching the top or side.
Example sentences
  • It has a tailored collar with top button loop, hemmed sleeves, matte pearl buttons, a double-layer back yoke with pleats, left chest pocket and a clean-finish hem with side vents.
  • Finally, keep in mind that pants with no pleats or a single pleat are more flattering than multiple pleats.
  • The long-sleeve style has button-through sleeve plackets, adjustable cuffs and a back pleat.
Sinónimos

verbo

[with object] Volver al principio  
Fold into pleats: (as adjective pleated) a short pleated skirt
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • My nana is tall, slim, and is in size 10 jeans, and she hates how pleated skirts look.
  • Her skirt was orange pleated, and barely covered the tops of her thighs.
  • She had a dark navy blue pleated skirt, a white t-shirt and yellow kneesocks on.
Sinónimos

Origen

late Middle English: a variant of plait. The written form of the word became obsolete between circa1700 and the end of the 19th century.

More
  • plight from (Old English):

    In the traditional marriage ceremony the bride and groom each say ‘I plight thee my troth’, meaning ‘I pledge my word’. Plight means ‘to promise solemnly’, and pledge (Middle English) is probably a distant relative. Troth is an old variant of truth, meaning ‘giving your word’ and still preserved in betroth (Middle English). The other meaning of plight, ‘a predicament’, is from Old French plit ‘fold’, suggesting the idea of a difficult or complicated situation. Other words from plit include Middle English pliant (Late Middle English) literally ‘foldable’; and pliable (Late Middle English); pliers (mid 16th century) tools for bending things; and ply (Late Middle English) in the sense of ‘thickness’ as in plywood (early 20th century). (The other ply as in ply with drink, is simply a shortening of apply, see appliance). Pleat and plait (Middle English) are further relatives. Compliant (mid 17th century) looks as if it should be a relative, but its immediate source, to comply (early 17th century), originally came from Latin complere ‘to fulfil, accomplish’, although compliant later developed senses influenced by its similarity to pliant.

Definición de pleat en:

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