Definición de pomegranate en inglés:

pomegranate

Saltos de línea: pom¦egran|ate
Pronunciación: /ˈpɒmɪɡranɪt
 
/

sustantivo

1A spherical fruit with a tough golden-orange outer skin and sweet red gelatinous flesh containing many seeds.
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Fill a tall, clear vase with lemons, apples or pomegranates, or lay the fruit on a collar of greenery tucked around a large hurricane lamp with candle.
  • Electronics stores and mechanics' workshops were doing business, and fruit stalls were laden with apples, pomegranate, grapes and bananas imported from neighbouring Pakistan.
  • How triumphantly his workmanship conveyed his vision may be seen, in particular, in his late painting of grapes, pomegranates and other fruit (Raisins et Grenadines, from the Louvre).
2The tree that bears the pomegranate, native to North Africa and western Asia.
  • Punica granatum, family Punicaceae
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • It has a wonderful courtyard, with walnut trees, pomegranate, vine, bamboo, oleander and roses.
  • There were dolphins, and swans, pomegranates and lime trees as she toyed with her human lover, Adonis, arguing for his love with Persephone.
  • This time it's Chal Chal Alayea El Rumman, a song about a pomegranate and a lemon tree that is, in fact, a political lament that relates to the end of the first world war.

Origen

Middle English: from Old French pome grenate, from pome 'apple' + grenate 'pomegranate' (from Latin (malum) granatum '(apple) having many seeds', from granum 'seed').

Definición de pomegranate en:

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