Hay 2 definiciones de rocket en inglés:

rocket1

Saltos de línea: rocket
Pronunciación: /ˈrɒkɪt
 
/

sustantivo

1A cylindrical projectile that can be propelled to a great height or distance by the combustion of its contents, used typically as a firework or signal.
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • The famed Brooklyn amusement park is a recurring motif in these paintings that feature carousel horses, Ferris wheels, fireworks, rockets and extravagant fantasy architecture.
  • He spent his summer vacation collaborating with scientists on a project involving launching small rockets into storm clouds above a desolate region to trigger lightning bolts.
  • Will this bizarre heist sizzle like a bottle rocket or fizzle like a defective firecracker?
Sinónimos
1.1 (also rocket engine or rocket motor) An engine that operates by the combustion of its contents, providing thrust as in a jet engine but without depending on the intake of air for combustion.
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • The rocket motor ignites following discharge from the cannon and extends the effective range of the cannon.
  • However, the propulsion device of a rocket can be called either a rocket motor or a rocket engine, and usage here seems not to have settled on one or the other.
  • While many of these technologies may seem like science fiction, so too were the jet engine, the airplane, and the rocket engine only 100 years ago.
1.2An elongated rocket-propelled missile or spacecraft: [as modifier]: a rocket launcher
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • At the start of World War II, he entered the Royal navy and served with distinction on mine sweepers, destroyers, and rocket launchers.
  • Helping the scientists with their endeavor is a group of astronauts tooling around in their high-tech rocket ship, led by space-stud Katsuo.
  • Many are heavily armed, while others must've arrived late the day that they were handing out rocket launchers.
1.3Used to refer to a person or thing that moves very fast or to an action that is done with great force: she shot out of her chair like a rocket
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • He doesn't get up quickly like a rocket but gets up slowly, no matter what the contents are.
  • Back in 1964, the son of comedian Jerry Lewis inked a contract with Liberty Records and took off like a bottle rocket.
  • His rocket to fame was fueled by awe-inspiring talent and brash wit.
2 [in singular] British informal A severe reprimand: he got a rocket from the Director

verbo (rockets, rocketing, rocketed)

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1 [no object] (Of an amount, price, etc.) increase very rapidly and suddenly: sales of milk in supermarkets are rocketing (as adjective rocketing) rocketing prices
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • In 2004, the box office take had rocketed to £74.5m, of which Russian films accounted for 12%.
  • Agents in Santa Clara County say sales are rocketing.
  • When the Fed raised rates another 75 basis points in early 2000, spreads were rocketing to historic highs.
Sinónimos
shoot up, soar, increase rapidly, rise rapidly, escalate, spiral upwards
1.1 [with adverbial of direction] Move very rapidly: [no object]: he rocketed to national stardom [with object]: she showed the kind of form that rocketed her to the semi-finals last year
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Critics have him pigeonholed as ‘Flash Gordon,’ that postmodern enfant terrible who rocketed to stardom on the supercharged fireworks of the State of Illinois Building in 1985.
  • Dancers popped and rocked downstage; two in-line skaters rocketed back and forth on the ramp, creating a dynamic backdrop.
  • As the ball rockets off his bat toward the lights above, Newman states the main title theme.
Sinónimos
speed, zoom, shoot, roar, whizz, career, go hell for leather
informal scorch, tear, go like a bat out of hell
British informal bomb
North American informal barrel, hightail it
2 [with object] Attack with rocket-propelled missiles: the city was rocketed and bombed from the air
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • He said helicopter gunships rocketed rebel positions in the jungle where the gunmen fled.
  • Just last week, gunships rocketed a training camp, killing 15 operatives.

Origen

early 17th century: from French roquette, from Italian rocchetto, diminutive of rocca 'distaff (for spinning)', with reference to its cylindrical shape.

Frases

rise like a rocket (and fall like a stick)

Rise suddenly and dramatically (and subsequently fall in a similar manner): the firm worries that, after rising like a rocket, exports could drop like the stick
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • The incorruptible Tom Paine once said of an opportunistic politician: ‘He rose like a rocket, but he falls like a stick’.
  • Writing after the 1981 riots Socialist Worker's Chris Harman described how ‘riots rise like a rocket, but fall like a stick’.
  • All I have to do is read a newspaper or turn on the TV and my rage rises like a rocket and keeps on climbing.

Definición de rocket en:

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Hay 2 definiciones de rocket en inglés:

rocket2

Saltos de línea: rocket
Pronunciación: /ˈrɒkɪt
 
/

sustantivo

1 (also garden rocket or salad rocket) [mass noun] British An edible Mediterranean plant of the cabbage family, whose leaves are eaten in salads.
  • Eruca vesicaria subsp. sativa, family Cruciferae
1.1Used in names of other fast-growing plants of the cabbage family, e.g. London rocket, sweet rocket.

Origen

late 15th century: from French roquette, from Italian ruchetta, diminutive of ruca, from Latin eruca 'downy-stemmed plant'.

Definición de rocket en: