Hay 4 definiciones de sally en inglés:

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sally1

Saltos de línea: sally
Pronunciación: /ˈsali
 
/

sustantivo (plural sallies)

1A sudden charge out of a besieged place against the enemy; a sortie: the garrison there made a sally against us
1.1A brief journey or sudden start into activity: his energetic sallies into the fields during harvesting
2A witty or lively remark, especially one made as an attack or as a diversion in an argument; a retort: there was subdued laughter at this sally his sally at Descartes
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Michael furiously takes down all the witty sallies and asides, converting the evening into his next gay play, and, hopefully, a success.
  • The show was certainly a lively, fast-moving, hilarious affair salted with quick-firing sallies of naval wit and wisdom.
  • In response to each new sally of witticism, the Indians would break into uncontrollable fits of merriment.
Sinónimos
witticism, witty remark, smart remark, quip, barb, pleasantry, epigram, aphorism;
joke, pun, jest;
retort, riposte, counter, rejoinder, return, retaliation;
Frenchbon mot

verbo (sallies, sallying, sallied)

[no object, with adverbial of direction] Volver al principio  
1Make a military sortie: they sallied out to harass the enemy
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Richard hesitated to land, not knowing the situation, but as soon as the garrison saw the sails, they sallied out to attack.
  • The city guard sallied out and drove away the Crusaders, but the Franks returned to Civetot laden with booty and regaling everyone with tales of their great ‘victory.’
  • Forced to rely on their own resources, they sallied out of the city walls and routed Rory's army.
1.1 formal or humorous Set out from a place to do something: I made myself presentable and sallied forth
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • So it was with great anticipation and alacrity that G.H.S. Tramp Club enthusiasts sallied forth every third Saturday.
  • So after about 20 minutes attempting 73 different and equally ridiculous configurations of the harness, including one that actually prevented BJ from standing up, we bravely sallied forth.
  • We sallied forth to Finsbury Park around three o'clock, joining the tens of thousands that were in attendance already, and the seemingly equal number that filed in thereafter as we sat and waited for further friends to arrive.

Origen

late Middle English: from French saillie, feminine past participle (used as a noun) of saillir 'come or jut out', from Old French salir 'to leap', from Latin salire.

More
  • salient from (mid 16th century):

    This was first used as a heraldic term meaning ‘leaping’. It comes from Latin salire ‘to leap’. The sense ‘outstanding, significant’ as in salient point is found from the mid 19th century. Salire is behind many other English words including assail and assault (Middle English) ‘jumping on’ people; exult (late 16th century) ‘jump up’; insult; and result (Late Middle English) originally meaning ‘to jump back’. Salacious (mid 17th century) ‘undue interest in sexual matters’ is based on Latin salax, from salire. Its basic sense is ‘fond of leaping’, but as the word was used of stud animals it came to mean ‘lustful’. From the French form of salire come to sally out (mid 16th century) and sauté (early 19th century).

Words that rhyme with sally

Ali, alley, Allie, Ally, bally, dally, dilly-dally, farfalle, galley, Halley, mallee, Mexicali, pally, Raleigh, rally, reveille, tally, valley

Definición de sally en:

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Hay 4 definiciones de sally en inglés:

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sally2

Saltos de línea: sally
Pronunciación: /ˈsali
 
/

sustantivo (plural sallies)

The part of a bell rope that has coloured wool woven into it to provide a grip for the bell-ringer’s hands.
Example sentences
  • There are two parts to the bell rope – the tail and the soft sally, which are pulled alternately to make the bell ring.
  • The teaching of the ringing of the backstroke ends when you can confidently let the learner ring it without intervention and you feel that he can set the bell at will and he can recover if the sally is not pulled with the correct strength.

Origen

mid 17th century (denoting the first movement of a bell when set for ringing): perhaps from sally1 in the sense 'leaping motion'.

More
  • salient from (mid 16th century):

    This was first used as a heraldic term meaning ‘leaping’. It comes from Latin salire ‘to leap’. The sense ‘outstanding, significant’ as in salient point is found from the mid 19th century. Salire is behind many other English words including assail and assault (Middle English) ‘jumping on’ people; exult (late 16th century) ‘jump up’; insult; and result (Late Middle English) originally meaning ‘to jump back’. Salacious (mid 17th century) ‘undue interest in sexual matters’ is based on Latin salax, from salire. Its basic sense is ‘fond of leaping’, but as the word was used of stud animals it came to mean ‘lustful’. From the French form of salire come to sally out (mid 16th century) and sauté (early 19th century).

Definición de sally en:

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Hay 4 definiciones de sally en inglés:

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sally3

Saltos de línea: sally
Pronunciación: /ˈsali
 
/
(also sallee)

sustantivo (plural sallies or sallees)

Australian
Any of a number of acacias and eucalyptuses that resemble willows.
  • Several species, including white sally (Eucalyptus pauciflora, family Myrtaceae)
Example sentences
  • The West of Ireland is favoured for this form of horticulture: the damp climate is ideally suited for willow cultivation, and for impatient gardeners the sally gives satisfyingly speedy results.

Origen

late 19th century: dialect variant of sallow2.

More
  • salient from (mid 16th century):

    This was first used as a heraldic term meaning ‘leaping’. It comes from Latin salire ‘to leap’. The sense ‘outstanding, significant’ as in salient point is found from the mid 19th century. Salire is behind many other English words including assail and assault (Middle English) ‘jumping on’ people; exult (late 16th century) ‘jump up’; insult; and result (Late Middle English) originally meaning ‘to jump back’. Salacious (mid 17th century) ‘undue interest in sexual matters’ is based on Latin salax, from salire. Its basic sense is ‘fond of leaping’, but as the word was used of stud animals it came to mean ‘lustful’. From the French form of salire come to sally out (mid 16th century) and sauté (early 19th century).

Definición de sally en:

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Hay 4 definiciones de sally en inglés:

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Sally4

Saltos de línea: Sally
Pronunciación: /ˈsali
 
/
(also Sally Army or Sallies)

sustantivo

British informal
The Salvation Army.
Example sentences
  • Although charity shops were once considered to be down-at-heel places into which nice people did not step, now no one much raises an eyebrow at the mention of spare time spent rummaging around in the local Sallies store.
  • His wife, Mary, back in New Zealand, chanced upon a copy of War Cry, the Sallies magazine, which mentioned Moss's rehabilitation.
  • The soles on these are wearing thin - time for another visit to the Sallies.

Origen

early 20th century: alteration of salvation.

Definición de sally en:

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