Hay 3 definiciones de shock en inglés:

shock1

Saltos de línea: shock
Pronunciación: /ʃɒk
 
/

sustantivo

1A sudden upsetting or surprising event or experience: it was a shock to face such hostile attitudes
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • It's a bit of a shock to experience the reality of the cruise liner rather than the fantasy - especially when the reality is just as fantastic in its own way.
  • And so nobody else has to go through this experience and the shock initially when that happens.
  • However, due to the shock of the experience and the upset caused to the young boy, the pair cut their holiday short and returned home.
1.1A feeling of disturbed surprise resulting from a sudden upsetting event: her death gave us all a terrible shock [mass noun]: her eyes opened wide in shock
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Devlin caught it instantly, wearing a look of utter shock on his face.
  • Sputtering, he broke the surface, a look of utter shock on his face.
  • Today was… pay day… and I got the biggest shock of my life.
Sinónimos
fright, scare, jolt, start, state of agitation/perturbation, distress, consternation, panic
informal turn
1.2A disturbance causing instability in an economy: trading imbalances caused by the two oil shocks
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • In the past, when India was an insulated economy, big oil shocks dented the country's national income and household savings.
  • In part, the persistence reflected what was thought to be the special, and transitory, impacts from the initial oil shocks to the economy.
  • The problem is exacerbated by the fact that Europe and Japan are also slowing, in the first concerted downturn since the oil shocks of the 1970s.
1.3 short for electric shock. the home-made lighting gave my father a shock when he touched the aquarium
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • No shocks occurred after medical therapy was optimized.
  • These electrodes serve a dual function: recording the electrocardiogram and giving a shock if indicated.
  • Automated external defibrillators offer lifesaving shocks to the heart
2 [mass noun] An acute medical condition associated with a fall in blood pressure, caused by such events as loss of blood, severe burns, allergic reaction, or sudden emotional stress, and marked by cold, pallid skin, irregular breathing, rapid pulse, and dilated pupils: he died of shock due to massive abdominal haemorrhage
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Hypovolaemic shock follows major blood loss which may be caused by trauma or during surgery.
  • Contraindications to the vaccines can be as severe as allergic shock, collapse, seizures, permanent brain injury or death.
  • This type of treatment must only be carried out under close supervision from a doctor because of the risk that it may cause a serious allergic reaction called anaphylactic shock.
Sinónimos
trauma, a state of shock, traumatism, prostration, stupor, stupefaction, collapse, breakdown
3A violent shaking movement caused by an impact, explosion, or tremor: earthquake shocks [mass noun]: rackets today don’t bend or absorb shock the way wooden rackets do
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Peeling himself off the disgusting plastic cover, Dylan shook the shock of the impact from his head and quickly regained his senses.
  • They are almost certainly unsafe, as they cannot absorb the shock of an impact, even at slow speeds.
  • A very simple answer would probably be to absorb the shock of impact.
Sinónimos
vibration, shaking movement, reverberation, shake, jolt, jar, jarring, jerk; bump, impact, blow, collision, crash, clash
4 short for shock absorber.
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • We just didn't have enough in the budget to fix the Charger if an axle broke or the shocks went out.
  • A country with bad roads does not require ceramic engines; it needs vehicles with rugged axles and shocks.
  • Improved suspension parts ranging from bushings to springs, shocks and tires make this vehicle a stand out in terms of handling and ride quality.

verbo

Volver al principio  
1 [with object] Cause (someone) to feel surprised and upset: she was shocked at the state of his injuries
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • She was visibly upset, and it shocked me, watching her.
  • But this week, when he visited, he was shocked and deeply upset to find his beloved wife's grave had been used as a dumping ground for the earth which had been removed from a next door grave.
  • We had a meeting to discuss the figures and people were shocked and surprised.
1.1Offend the moral feelings of; outrage: the revelations shocked the nation
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • He projected an unpretentious, open image, and his reputation for moral rectitude became a crucial asset for a nation still shocked by the Watergate scandal.
  • While others were quite shocked or even offended by the waitress's behaviour, I was very amused.
  • I believe that future generations will be shocked and outraged that it took us so long.
Sinónimos
appal, horrify, scandalize, outrage, repel, revolt, disgust, nauseate, sicken, offend, give offence to, traumatize, make someone's blood run cold, distress, upset, perturb, disturb, disquiet, unsettle, discompose, agitate; stun, rock, stagger, astound, astonish, amaze, startle, surprise, dumbfound, daze, shake, shake up, jolt, set someone back on their heels, take aback, throw, unnerve, disconcert, bewilder
1.2 [no object] Experience outrage: he shocked so easily
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • They have decades of experience and aren't shocked easily but they are becoming more and more disillusioned with present day Ireland.
  • The former Army colour sergeant who has served in the Middle and Far East with the Royal Marines and Royal Military Police, is not easily shocked.
  • Not for the easily shocked, his four-letter tirades - which prompted one walk-out - were interspersed by a spate of ingenious gags.
2Affect with physiological shock, or with an electric shock: if a patient is deeply shocked, measurement of blood pressure may be difficult
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Implanted in the chest, the ICD is a small electronic device which shocks the heart back into a healthy rhythm if it detects an abnormal heartbeat.
  • The electric current shocks the sweat glands, and they stop producing sweat temporarily.
  • Patients who remain shocked after 3 litres of intravenous fluid usually have continued bleeding and require urgent laparotomy.
3 [no object] archaic Collide violently: carriage after carriage shocked fiercely against the engine

Origen

mid 16th century: from French choc (noun), choquer (verb), of unknown origin. The original senses were 'throw (troops) into confusion by charging at them' and 'an encounter between charging forces', giving rise to the notion of 'sudden violent blow or impact'.

Frases

short, sharp shock

British
A brief but harsh custodial sentence intended to discourage an offender from committing further offences: the short, sharp shock didn’t affect me—I carried on stealing
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • ‘This is a case where a short, sharp shock is all that is needed, bearing in mind his relatively young age and his background generally,’ said the spokesman.
  • A short, sharp shock is all very well, but a couple of millennia of rather extreme corporal punishments haven't exactly shown us that prison provides much by way of rehab.

Derivativos

shockability

Pronunciación: /-ˈbɪlɪti/
sustantivo
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • I thought Edinburgh Fringe audiences were way beyond shockability.
  • Some people have written that our work has a shockability value, but I never think that is the case.
  • Curiously enough, women seldom show any signs of timidity or shockability on the battlefield.

shockable

adjetivo
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • They take you back to a time when it was still possible to be transported into another world - a time when you half-believed in magic, and remained infinitely shockable.
  • A reliable narrator, I would suggest, is an intelligent, shockable, conscientious and perceptive, human being.
  • In front of as many shockable adults as possible.

Definición de shock en:

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Palabra del día meretricious
Pronunciación: ˌmɛrɪˈtrɪʃəs
adjective
apparently attractive but having no real value...

Hay 3 definiciones de shock en inglés:

shock2

Saltos de línea: shock
Pronunciación: /ʃɒk
 
/

sustantivo

A group of twelve sheaves of grain placed upright and supporting each other to allow the grain to dry and ripen.
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • This accumulation of the bundles in the field was a big help for the manual labor which is what it took to assemble grain shocks from all those bundles!
  • The grain shocks would be off-loaded into the thrashing machines.
  • The field of wheat is well in the foreground, diversified and defined by the shocks of grain to the right.

verbo

[with object] Volver al principio  
Arrange (sheaves of grain) in a shock: the grain is shocked in the field after it is cut
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Michael showed me how to cut oats with the horse-drawn grain binder and shock the bundles to dry.
  • One story accounts that Thomas refused to go to the fort until after his grain was shocked.
  • During harvest time they were shocking bundles of grain and hauling them to the threshing outfit and pitching them into the separator.

Origen

Middle English: perhaps from Middle Dutch, Middle Low German schok, of unknown origin.

Definición de shock en:

Hay 3 definiciones de shock en inglés:

shock3

Saltos de línea: shock
Pronunciación: /ʃɒk
 
/

sustantivo

An unkempt or thick mass of hair: a man with a shock of ginger hair
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • He is handsome, with high cheekbones, a strong chin, and a shock of thick hair, and he stares with a slight frown at something in the distance.
  • He had a thick shock of dark brown hair, with a little gray peeking in around his temples and just above his ears.
  • He has a shock of thick snow-blond hair that is certain to attract the others in white.
Sinónimos
mass, mane, mop, thatch, head, crop, bush, cloud, frizz, fuzz, foam, curls, tangle, chaos, cascade, quiff, halo

Origen

mid 17th century: origin uncertain; compare with obsolete shough, denoting a breed of lapdog. The word originally denoted a dog with long shaggy hair, and was then used as an adjective meaning 'unkempt, shaggy'. The current sense dates from the early 19th century.

Definición de shock en: