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slit

Saltos de línea: slit
Pronunciación: /slɪt
 
/

Definición de slit en inglés:

sustantivo

A long, narrow cut or opening: make a slit in the stem under a bud arrow slits
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • At this stage, they'll also check your garments for slits, broken buttons or zippers, and any other irregularities.
  • At the end of the glans is a small slit or opening, which is where semen and urine exit the body through the urethra.
  • A wrinkled tee shirt with shredded slits of material barely concealed her.
Sinónimos

verbo (slits, slitting, slit)

[with object] Volver al principio  
1Make a long, narrow cut in: give me the truth or I will slit your throat [with object and complement]: he slit open the envelope
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Kari slit open the envelope as she trotted up the stairs.
  • Aiur eyed him, but she slit open the envelope and pulled out a thin sheet of paper.
  • He held a knife, which shook between leather-gloved fingers, as he slit open the front of the dress.
Sinónimos
cut, slash, split open, slice open, gash, lacerate, make an incision in;
tear, rip;
pierce, knife, lance
literary rend
1.1Cut (something) into strips: a wide recording head magnetizes the tape before it is slit to domestic size
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • When a guard takes out a knife and slits the plastic of one, a light-green herb spurts out.
  • With a sharp knife, slit the skin and its underlying layer along the length of each section.
  • Juki's sword slashed his robe, slitting the middle.
2 (past and past participle slitted) Form (one’s eyes) into slits; squint: she slitted her eyes to look at him (as adjective slitted) slitted eyes
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • His tiny eyes were slitted, as he squinted at Adam in the dark.
  • Mai stirred and slitted an eye at him, ‘Why not trot on over and have a look then? ‘she asked.’
  • If he was confused at my flippancy, he didn't show it, and I was a little disappointed when he merely crossed his arms and slitted his eyes in amusement.

Origen

late Old English slite (noun); related to Old English slītan 'split, rend' (of Germanic origin).

More
  • slate from (Middle English):

    This is from the Old French esclat ‘a piece broken off’. Slat (Late Middle English) is a variant which meant ‘roofing slate’ until it developed the current sense in the mid 18th century. Schoolchildren formerly used flat pieces of slate for writing on in chalk, and shops and bars used the same materials for keeping a record of what a customer owed. This is the origin of the expression on the slate, ‘to be paid for later, on credit’. The related French esclice ‘splinter’ gives us slice (Middle English) and their common Germanic source also gives us slit (Old English). In the sense ‘to criticize’, dating from the mid 19th century, slate is probably a different word. It might derive from the slightly earlier Irish sense ‘to beat, beat up’ and be related to a Scots use of slate meaning ‘to set a dog on’, which is from Old Norse.

Derivados

slitter

1
sustantivo
Example sentences
  • The knife has multiple slitting blades with a stripping bar following the slitters.
  • Automated de-boners and slitters sliced the meat off bones and processors turned other parts into various pieces.
  • Unlike the patent slitters, mine has no edge for scraping the corn off, but the back of a knife blade worked just fine.

Definición de slit en:

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