Hay 4 definiciones de tick en inglés:

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tick1

Saltos de línea: tick

sustantivo

1British A mark (✓) used to indicate that an item in a list or text is correct or has been chosen, checked, or dealt with.
Example sentences
  • A map of the Urus-Martan area is black from ticks and marks indicating ordnance.
  • Each feature description also included a screenshot and a tick mark indicating whether it made significant use of graphics or not.
  • Each tick mark indicates that a nucleotide within the strain differs from the consensus sequence.
Sinónimos
mark, stroke, dash, line;
North American check, check mark
2A regular short, sharp sound, especially that made by a clock or watch: the comforting tick of the grandfather clock
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • In a sport in which the times are measured in hundredths of a second, she beat Giove, who took second, by 20 ticks of the clock.
  • Three seconds, three ticks of the clock, and the transformation from smoke to human was complete.
  • By using the very basis of matter, we can define the second to be 9,192,631,770 ticks of the caesium clock.
Sinónimos
clicking, click, clack, clacking, click-clack, ticking, tick-tock, snick, snicking, plock, plocking, beat, tap, tapping
2.1British informal A moment: I shan’t be a tick I’ll be with you in a tick
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • No, but, I mean, hang on a tick, it's how well a film can convince you of that.
Sinónimos
informal sec, jiffy, jiff
British informal mo, two ticks
(very) soon, in a second, in a minute, in a moment, in a trice, in a flash, shortly, any second, any minute, any minute now, in a short time, in an instant, in the twinkling of an eye, in (less than) no time, in no time at all, before you know it, before long;
North American momentarily
British informal in two ticks, in a mo
North American informal in a snap
3 Stock Exchange The smallest recognized amount by which a price of a security or future may fluctuate.
Example sentences
  • If you want to further refine the trailing buy stop technique, you can lower your buy order the next day to the level one tick above the latest price bar.
  • This establishes a baseline volume for the day to which all subsequent ticks can be related.
  • If the quick dose of bullishness is sustained longer than anticipated, you can raise your sell order every day to stay within a tick of the latest low.

verbo

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1 [with object] chiefly British Mark (an item) with a tick or select (a box) on a form, questionnaire, etc. to indicate that something has been chosen, checked, approved, or dealt with: just tick the appropriate box below
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • By Sun standards this is subtle stuff but the message could not be more obvious: readers are being coaxed into ticking the box marked ‘bad outweighs good’.
  • Those stopped in the street and asked if they are ‘minded to make a big purchase’ will continue to tick the box marked ‘no’.
  • ‘Those who consider themselves British, but have Irish roots, can still tick the Irish box’.
Sinónimos
2 [no object] (Of a clock or other mechanical device) make regular short, sharp sounds, typically one for every second of time that passes: I could hear the clock ticking
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • All that could be heard besides the patter of raindrops against the window was the sound of the clock ticking off the seconds.
  • The calendar is loaded, the meter is ticking and that damn clock has to be fast, doesn't it?
  • She suddenly took notice of what sounded like a clock ticking.
Sinónimos
click, clack, tick-tock, snick, plock, beat, tap
2.1 (tick away/by/past) (Of time) pass: the minutes were ticking away till the actor’s appearance
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • At intervals I went to the front window to see if the sign had arrived, becoming more and more impatient as the morning passed and the afternoon ticked away.
  • But as time passed and seconds slowly ticked away like eternity, Liz began to lose hope.
  • The long chain of people moved irritably slow, minutes ticking by with seemingly no progress being made.
2.2Proceed or progress: her book was ticking along nicely
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • The Budget shouldn't be a giveaway, but must be ‘broadly neutral’ to keep the economy ticking along.
  • Local eateries were doing very well, while the pubs seemed to be doing well also and, for business in general, things were ticking along better than last year.
  • Less than 2 weeks to go now (12 days, to be exact) and everything's ticking along nicely.

Origen

Middle English (as a verb in the sense 'pat, touch'): probably of Germanic origin and related to Dutch tik (noun), tikken (verb) 'pat, touch'. The noun was recorded in late Middle English as 'a light tap'; current senses date from the late 17th century.

More
  • The tick shown as a ✓ first meant ‘to pat, touch’ and goes back to medieval English, where it was related to tickle (Middle English), although its history is obscure. This is also the tick used to imitate the sound of a clock, and in ticker, or the heart, a sense first used in the USA at the end of the 19th century. The ‘bloodsucking parasite’ sort of tick is a different, older word which gives us the expressions tight as a tick or as full as a tick for ‘very drunk’, both of which refer to the way ticks swell as they gorge themselves on blood. Both forms of the phrase have the additional meaning ‘be full after eating’, but the more recent tight as a tick plays on two senses of tight, which can mean both ‘drunk’ and ‘stretched taut’. When you buy on credit or on tick, you are using yet another word, which is an abbreviation of ticket. The ticket in question is an IOU promising to pay the money due, but there is also the suggestion of a pun on the reputation of moneylenders as ‘bloodsucking parasites’. Both on tick and on the ticket date back to the 17th century.

Frases

tick all the (right) boxes

1
British informal
Fulfil all the necessary requirements: the new album should tick all the right boxes for their many fans
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Fox is a crime writer who can tick all the right boxes.
  • No contender, real or perceived, ticks all the boxes.
  • The spokesman said he " ticked all the boxes ".

what makes someone tick

2
informal What motivates someone: people are curious to know what makes British men tick
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • We're good at finding out about people, what makes them tick, what they are interested in, what they have bees in their bonnets about - a key networking skill.
  • I'd like the opportunity to find out a bit what they were like as people, what makes them tick, and, you know, enjoy their company.
  • No one really knows how these people think, what makes them tick, and which of the five contenders stirs their blood.

Verbos con partícula

tick someone off

1
1British informal Reprimand or rebuke someone: he was ticked off by Angela (as noun ticking off) he got a ticking off from the magistrate
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Then we were ticked off for not taking enough exercise.
  • She was ticking us off for a number of administrative errors but I think she has every confidence in the leadership we give to the appointments commission.
  • Beyond the door Matron was ticking Bentham off for leaving Thomas alone and the other nurses were gathering, quizzing each other and expressing dismay.
2North American informal Make someone annoyed or angry: (as adjective ticked off) Jefferson was a little ticked off, but he’ll come around
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Please forgive me and know that I likewise extend forgiveness to all who have offended, insulted, irritated, or otherwise ticked me off.
  • Those girls were always doing something to tick him off, angering him more than humanly possible.
  • So at this point, was I worried about ticking them off?
Sinónimos
annoy, irritate, infuriate, anger, incense, inflame, enrage, vex, irk, chagrin, exasperate, madden, pique, provoke, nettle, disturb, upset, perturb, discompose, put out, try, try someone's patience, get on someone's nerves, bother, trouble, worry, agitate, ruffle, hound, rankle with, nag, torment, pain, distress, tease, frustrate, chafe, grate, fret, gall, outrage, displease, offend, disgust, dissatisfy, disquiet;
Northern English mither
British informal nark, get on someone's wick, give someone the hump, wind up, get across
North American informal rankle, ride, gravel, bum out
vulgar slang piss off
British vulgar slang get on someone's tits

tick something off

2
chiefly British
1Mark an item in a list with a tick to show that it has been dealt with: I ticked several items off my ‘to do’ list
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Mr Howarth said: "We had a leaflet on meningitis and when we ticked off the symptoms the alarm bells started ringing".
  • Sipping bottled water before the concert in Huntington in March, he ticked off a long list of luminaries with whom he had worked.
  • Then it is ticked off a list of all birds found in this country.
2List items one by one in one’s mind or during a speech: he ticked the points off on his fingers
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • The officer was going down a mental list and ticking the items off on his fingers. ‘… possession of drugs, possession of illegal weapons and technology, and assaulting an officer of the North American army.
  • ‘Well, she's really small, absolutely gorgeous, drives a hot car, goes by animal names, loud, bossy,’ Samuel listed, ticking each description off on a new finger.
  • He had been ticking the items off on his fingers with the air of a housewife listing tasks yet to be done; now he laced the fingers behind his head and sighed vastly.

tick over

3
(Of an engine) run slowly in neutral: his Mercedes was waiting for him, the engine ticking over
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • It is most content cruising at high speed, with the engine ticking over quietly - but always with the promise of immense reserves of power.
  • It really isn't possible to troll using a petrol outboard, they just can't tick over slowly enough.
  • He wasn't conscious of the faint sound of a car engine ticking over, a little way up the street outside.
Sinónimos
idle, run slowly in neutral
3.1Work or function at a basic or minimum level: they are keeping things ticking over until their father returns
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • There's also a problem in that my normal mode of thinking of stuff to write about is mostly because my mind sort of ticks over if I'm not thinking of anything particularly fiercely.
  • I think there was more pressure on me at the time because I came in to keep things ticking over for Celtic.
  • They keep all the bits in working order, not just ticking over in a repetitious way.

Definición de tick en:

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Hay 4 definiciones de tick en inglés:

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tick2

Saltos de línea: tick

sustantivo

1A parasitic arachnid which attaches itself to the skin of a terrestrial vertebrate from which it sucks blood, leaving the host when sated. Some species transmit diseases, including tularaemia and Lyme disease.
Example sentences
  • It takes 24 hours for a tick to transmit Lyme disease, so rapid removal is important.
  • Mites and ticks which feed on vertebrate hair or blood often carry disease organisms, such as spirochete bacteria, responsible for relapsing fever and Lyme disease.
  • More than a nuisance, fleas and ticks can transmit a host of pathogens and skin diseases to humans and their furry counterparts.
1.1 informal A parasitic louse fly, especially the sheep ked.
2British informal A worthless or contemptible person: he was shown up in court for the little tick that he was
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • He really is an irritating little tick, isn't he?
  • By comparison with Richard, then, John has been seen as a weedy little tick.
  • Katzenberg, 53, is the part genius, part egomaniac and part irritating little tick who Disney froze out.

Origen

Old English ticia, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch teek and German Zecke.

More
  • The tick shown as a ✓ first meant ‘to pat, touch’ and goes back to medieval English, where it was related to tickle (Middle English), although its history is obscure. This is also the tick used to imitate the sound of a clock, and in ticker, or the heart, a sense first used in the USA at the end of the 19th century. The ‘bloodsucking parasite’ sort of tick is a different, older word which gives us the expressions tight as a tick or as full as a tick for ‘very drunk’, both of which refer to the way ticks swell as they gorge themselves on blood. Both forms of the phrase have the additional meaning ‘be full after eating’, but the more recent tight as a tick plays on two senses of tight, which can mean both ‘drunk’ and ‘stretched taut’. When you buy on credit or on tick, you are using yet another word, which is an abbreviation of ticket. The ticket in question is an IOU promising to pay the money due, but there is also the suggestion of a pun on the reputation of moneylenders as ‘bloodsucking parasites’. Both on tick and on the ticket date back to the 17th century.

Frases

full (or tight) as a tick

1
informal Replete after eating (or very drunk): I’ve never risen from the table after a feed anything less than full as a tick
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • By the end of the day, I was full as a tick and red from stem to stern with barbecue sauce, watermelon, and sunburn.
  • I can't speak for Eli, but I'll be tight as a tick on a bloodhound come Saturday.
  • Cows that had been standing around in the yard, looking full as a tick, would put their heads down and start grazing as soon as they hit the new grass.

Definición de tick en:

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Hay 4 definiciones de tick en inglés:

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tick3

Saltos de línea: tick

sustantivo

1A fabric case stuffed with feathers or other material to form a mattress or pillow.
Example sentences
  • He quickly reached the top and started throwing down ticks, pillows and blankets.
  • They reach for the money, which is very close to where Huck is standing, and move it to the straw tick under the feather bed.
  • ‘Yes sir,’ she whispered as Jeeka entered the house with the full straw ticks.
1.1 short for ticking.

Origen

late Middle English: probably Middle Low German, Middle Dutch tēke, or Middle Dutch tīke, via West Germanic from Latin theca 'case', from Greek thēkē.

More
  • The tick shown as a ✓ first meant ‘to pat, touch’ and goes back to medieval English, where it was related to tickle (Middle English), although its history is obscure. This is also the tick used to imitate the sound of a clock, and in ticker, or the heart, a sense first used in the USA at the end of the 19th century. The ‘bloodsucking parasite’ sort of tick is a different, older word which gives us the expressions tight as a tick or as full as a tick for ‘very drunk’, both of which refer to the way ticks swell as they gorge themselves on blood. Both forms of the phrase have the additional meaning ‘be full after eating’, but the more recent tight as a tick plays on two senses of tight, which can mean both ‘drunk’ and ‘stretched taut’. When you buy on credit or on tick, you are using yet another word, which is an abbreviation of ticket. The ticket in question is an IOU promising to pay the money due, but there is also the suggestion of a pun on the reputation of moneylenders as ‘bloodsucking parasites’. Both on tick and on the ticket date back to the 17th century.

Definición de tick en:

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Hay 4 definiciones de tick en inglés:

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tick4

Saltos de línea: tick

sustantivo

(in phrase on tick) British informal
On credit: the printer agreed to send the brochures out on tick
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • If you buy it on tick it'll be worn out before you've finished paying for it.
  • Living on tick, Adam sees nothing for it but to hop back aboard the carousel of fashionable metropolitan parties.
  • It's a sign of changed circumstances in the Valley that another growth area is the repossession of cars bought on tick, whose owners can no longer afford to keep up the repayments.

Origen

mid 17th century: apparently short for ticket in the phrase on the ticket, referring to an IOU or promise to pay.

More
  • The tick shown as a ✓ first meant ‘to pat, touch’ and goes back to medieval English, where it was related to tickle (Middle English), although its history is obscure. This is also the tick used to imitate the sound of a clock, and in ticker, or the heart, a sense first used in the USA at the end of the 19th century. The ‘bloodsucking parasite’ sort of tick is a different, older word which gives us the expressions tight as a tick or as full as a tick for ‘very drunk’, both of which refer to the way ticks swell as they gorge themselves on blood. Both forms of the phrase have the additional meaning ‘be full after eating’, but the more recent tight as a tick plays on two senses of tight, which can mean both ‘drunk’ and ‘stretched taut’. When you buy on credit or on tick, you are using yet another word, which is an abbreviation of ticket. The ticket in question is an IOU promising to pay the money due, but there is also the suggestion of a pun on the reputation of moneylenders as ‘bloodsucking parasites’. Both on tick and on the ticket date back to the 17th century.

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