Hay 2 definiciones de tingle en inglés:

tingle1

Saltos de línea: tin¦gle
Pronunciación: /ˈtɪŋɡ(ə)l
 
/

verbo

Experience or cause to experience a slight prickling or stinging sensation: [no object]: she was tingling with excitement [with object]: a standing ovation that tingled your spine
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Suddenly, Jerry's spine tingled, as a slight breeze washed over him.
  • She felt the corner of her eyes prickle and her nose tingled as tiny tears slipped down her cheek, mingling with the blood.
  • I knew Seth wasn't jealous or anything but my stomach tingled at the slightest possibility that he was.
Sinónimos
prickle, sting, smart, prick, itch, be itchy, be irritated, have a creeping sensation, have goose pimples, have gooseflesh, have pins and needles;
North American have goosebumps
tremble, quiver, quaver, shiver, quake, twitch, wiggle, throb, shudder, pulsate, vibrate

sustantivo

Volver al principio  
A slight prickling or stinging sensation: a tingle of anticipation
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • A slight tingle filled her hands as she held the vessel and she could feel her anxiety pass into nothingness.
  • At the moment, all she felt was a slight tingle on the surface of her skin.
  • At most, such discharges may cause a slight tingle in the skin of those touching the patient at the time.
Sinónimos
North American goosebumps
tremor, wave, rush, surge, flash, flush, blaze, stab, dart, throb, tremble, quiver, shiver, flutter, shudder, vibration;
flow, gush, stream, flood, torrent

Origen

late Middle English: perhaps a variant of tinkle. The original notion was perhaps 'ring in response to a loud noise', but the term was very early applied to the result of hearing something shocking.

Definición de tingle en:

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Hay 2 definiciones de tingle en inglés:

tingle2

Saltos de línea: tin¦gle
Pronunciación: /ˈtɪŋɡ(ə)l
 
/

sustantivo

An S-shaped metal clip used to support heavy panes of glass or slates on a roof.

Origen

Middle English (denoting a small tack): related to Middle High German zingel 'small tack or hook', probably from a Germanic base meaning 'fasten'. The current sense dates from the late 19th century.

Definición de tingle en: