Share this entry

Share this page

umpire

Saltos de línea: um¦pire
Pronunciación: /ˈʌmpʌɪə
 
/

Definición de umpire en inglés:

sustantivo

1(In some sports) an official who watches a game or match closely to enforce the rules and arbitrate on matters arising from the play.
Example sentences
  • But the point here is that such a play does not give umpires the mandate to reverse any call.
  • The primary purpose of UIS, he says, is to serve as a training tool, giving umpires objective feedback.
  • Hoy is often credited as the reason umpires adopted hand signals for safe, out, and strike calls, which would make for a nice little niche in baseball history.
Sinónimos
informal ref
North American informal ump
1.1A person chosen to arbitrate between contending parties.
Example sentences
  • The second great purpose of the monarchy is to be available as an impartial umpire above party when the nation is split by a constitutional crisis.
  • In the event the two arbitrators fail to agree on an umpire either party shall have the right to submit the matter to the Canadian Arbitration Association.
  • Before things escalated Monday, umpires got in the middle of the scrum.

verbo

[no object] Volver al principio  
Act as an umpire in a game or match: he could be seen regularly umpiring for the club [with object]: he umpired the World Cup final
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Linda Barker chose the school's head of girls games to umpire a rounders match.
  • He is standing in his 12th Test match and has umpired 62 one-day internationals.
  • Nigel Iggo, an international umpire from Christchurch who last month umpired both finals at four-nation tournaments in Australia, said umpires had been using the interpretation for some time.
Sinónimos
referee, adjudicate, arbitrate, judge, moderate, oversee, supervise;
Cricket stand
informal ref

Origen

late Middle English (originally as noumpere) (denoting an arbitrator): from Old French nonper 'not equal'. The n was lost by wrong division of a noumpere; compare with adder1.

More
  • pair from (Middle English):

    Pair comes from Latin paria ‘equal things’, formed from par ‘equal’. Latin par also lies behind compare (Late Middle English) ‘to pair with, bring together’; disparage (Middle English) originally ‘a mis-pairing especially in marriage’, later ‘to discredit’; nonpareil (Late Middle English) ‘not equalled’ (taken directly from the French); par (late 16th century) ‘equal’, a golfing term from L19th; parity [L16] ‘equalness’; peer (Middle English) ‘equal’; and umpire (Middle English) originally noumpere, from the same source as nonpareil, because an umpire is above all the players. A noumpere was later re-interpreted as ‘an umpire’ and the initial ‘n’ was lost.

Derivados

umpirage

1
sustantivo
Example sentences
  • Nations without that umpirage are in the condition of a population without government.
  • The invention relates to a whistle for use in umpirage of athletic games and in security jobs including guiding and signaling to gathering people.
  • There he spoke eloquently ‘of cultivating general friendship, and of bringing collisions of interest to the umpirage of reason rather than of force.’

Words that rhyme with umpire

vampireempireoccupier

Definición de umpire en:

Share this entry

Share this page

 

¿Qué te llama la atención de esta palabra o frase?

Comments that don't adhere to our Community Guidelines may be moderated or removed.

Obtenga más de Oxford Dictionaries

Suscribirse para eliminar anuncios y acceder a los recursos premium

Palabra del día reciprocity
Pronunciación: ˌrɛsɪˈprɒsɪti
noun
exchanging things with others for mutual benefit…