Hay 2 definiciones de apostrophe en inglés:

apostrophe1

Silabificación: a·pos·tro·phe
Pronunciación: /əˈpästrəfē
 
/

sustantivo

A punctuation mark ( ’ ) used to indicate either possession (e.g., Harry’s book; boys’ coats) or the omission of letters or numbers (e.g., can’t; he’s; class of ’99).
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • The playwrights' experimental use of English (including the absence of capital letters, apostrophes, punctuation, etc.) is one way in which they resist oppression.
  • Still others prefer a middle option that keeps the apostrophe for omission and elision but drops it for plurality and possession.
  • When the possessor is single we indicate possession by using an apostrophe followed by the letter ‘s’ - ‘The man's coat’.

Origen

mid 16th century (denoting the omission of one or more letters): via late Latin, from Greek apostrophos 'accent of elision', from apostrephein 'turn away', from apo 'from' + strephein 'to turn'.

Uso

The apostrophe is used to indicate missing letters or numbers ( bo’sun; the summer of ’63), to form some possessives (see possessive (usage)), and to form some plurals (see plural (usage)).

Definición de apostrophe en:

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Palabra del día antebellum
Pronunciación: ˌantɪˈbɛləm
adjective
occurring or existing before a particular war…

Hay 2 definiciones de apostrophe en inglés:

apostrophe2

Silabificación: a·pos·tro·phe
Pronunciación: /
 
əˈpästrəfē/

sustantivo

Rhetoric
An exclamatory passage in a speech or poem addressed to a person (typically one who is dead or absent) or thing (typically one that is personified).
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • To stress apostrophe, personification, prosopopoeia, and hyperbole is to join the theorists who through the ages have emphasized what distinguishes the lyric from other speech acts, what makes it the most literary of forms.
  • Let us note, first of all, that hyperbole and apostrophe are the forms of language not only most agreeable to it but also most necessary.
  • What better trope for the undertaking than the apostrophe?

Origen

mid 16th century: via Latin from Greek apostrophē 'turning away', from apostrephein 'turn away' (see apostrophe1).

Definición de apostrophe en: