Hay 4 definiciones de bob en inglés:

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bob1

División en sílabas: bob

verbo (bobs, bobbing, bobbed)

[no object]
1(Of a thing) make a quick short movement up and down: I could see his red head bobbing around the boat bobbed up and down
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • As we approached the jetty a speedboat whisked past sending our boat bobbing violently in its wake.
  • Your hired motor boat is bobbing up and down at anchor, occasionally nudging the pebbles on the beach as a bigger wave breaks.
  • She shook her head, her short blond locks bobbing around her head.
1.1 [with object] Cause (something) to make a quick short movement up and down: she bobbed her head
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • You can't help but bob your shoulders and sway your hips to the raunchy jazz in this number!
  • He keeps filming the milky-eyed and toothless bluehair as she bobs her head around, struggling to focus on who she's talking to.
  • The bird bobs its head, showing more interest in its surroundings than the man who sustains an unaffected stare.
1.2Make a sudden move in a particular direction so as to appear or disappear: a lady bobbed up from beneath the counter
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Birds bobbed up and down, up and down, disappearing and disappearing again.
  • A brown head bobbed up from beneath a pile of displaced couch cushions, then a body, and a hand holding a sketching pad.
  • St Johnstone, who had bobbed up a bit from the bottom, had not pulled away in their last couple of fixtures either, having lost to Celtic and more controversially Hearts in midweek.
1.3Move up and down briefly in a curtsy.
Example sentences
  • She gripped tightly on her pinafore, creasing it more than any lady would have approved of, and bobbed into a curtsy.

sustantivo

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1A movement up and down: she could only manage a slight bob of her head
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • With a quick bob of her tongue she span back around and marched down the corridor, opening the classroom door by magic without even realising she had done it.
  • Unlike Garrett's bewildered reaction, Clara only gave a slight bob of her head to acknowledge him.
  • Her mistress gave a slight bob of her head, and she began bustling about, stirring up the fire.
1.1 another term for bobber.
1.2A curtsy.
Example sentences
  • ‘Excuse me, my lady, but my lady Kei said for me to bring Nichole here to you for a bit,’ said Lela with a slight bob to signify a curtsey.

Origen

late Middle English: of unknown origin.

More
  • Short words are often the hardest to pin down, and this is the case with bob, which has many uses. Some imply ‘short’; for example, the hairstyle, which became fashionable in the 1920s. Before that people had used bob for a horse's docked tail, a short bunch of hair or curls, and a short wig, and the bob in bobcat (late 19th century), bobsleigh (mid 19th century), and bobtail (mid 16th century) also means ‘short’.

    Another set of uses involves a quick, short movement. People and things bob up and down, and boxers bob and weave. The British bob, ‘a shilling’, dating from the late 18th century, does not appear to be related to any of these, and its origin remains a mystery.

    Bob's your uncle, used to draw attention to the ease with which something can be done, is from the pet form of the name Robert. The Robert in question may have been Lord Salisbury, who in 1887 gave the important post of Chief Secretary for Ireland to his nephew, Arthur Balfour, who was only 39 at the time. The problem with this suggestion is that the earliest recorded examples do not appear until the 1930s, around 50 years after the incident in question. However, we do know that the British bobby comes from Sir Robert Peel, British Home Secretary from 1828–30, who established the Metropolitan Police. The old-fashioned term peelers for policemen also comes from his name.

Frases

bob and weave

1
Make rapid bodily movements up and down and from side to side, for example as an evasive tactic by a boxer.
Example sentences
  • This way, boxers could bob and weave out of the way of incoming punches.
  • As someone who stood on a curbside box in the innocent 1950s to witness my first Macy's parade, I have never completely lost that long-ago wonder at seeing giant cartoon figures bob and weave amid the skyscrapers.
  • They bob and weave and move and that's what they're doing.

bob for apples

2
Try to catch floating or hanging apples with one’s mouth alone, as a game.
Example sentences
  • There's bobbing for apples in the Great Hall and a game of Web of Fate taking place in the ballroom shortly.
  • If you're not bobbing for apples, you're hollowing out pumpkins; and if you're not putting daft expressions on gourds, you're splashing fake blood on your children and sending them out into the dead of night to beg for sweets.
  • Maybe we'll organize a Halloween party as well, complete with bobbing for apples.

Words that rhyme with bob

blob, cob, dob, fob, glob, gob, hob, job, knob, lob, mob, nob, rob, slob, snob, sob, squab, stob, swab, throb, yob

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Hay 4 definiciones de bob en inglés:

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bob2

División en sílabas: bob

sustantivo

1A style in which the hair is cut short and evenly all around so that it hangs above the shoulders.
Example sentences
  • She had auburn hair styled in a bob cut, gentle, hazel eyes, and the greatest smile that had ever graced any thin, yet soft face.
  • Linda Evangelista had the shortest hair with a bob to the bottom of her neck.
  • I've had my hair cut from just above my waist to a short bob and it looks really thick and bushy.
2A weight on a pendulum, plumb line, or kite-tail.
Example sentences
  • The functioning of a key depends on its rigidity whilst that of clocks and watches depend crucially on the weight of pendulum bobs or the elasticity of springs.
  • Newton showed that after appropriate corrections are made for air resistance, action and reaction are equal regardless of whether the pendulum bobs are composed of steel, glass, cork, or wool.
  • The relationship between the masses of the replica pendulum bobs and the mass of the overall platform was roughly the same, and the clocks' periods were also comparable.
3A bobsled.
Example sentences
  • If we sent the skaters down the bob run, there would be no politics, no guessing, no favors exchanged.
4A short line at or near the end of a stanza.
5A horse’s tail docked short.

verbo (bobs, bobbing, bobbed)

Volver al principio  
1 [with object] (usually as adjective bobbed) Cut (someone’s hair) in a bob: she tied a headscarf over her bobbed brown hair
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Emily, when I last saw her, was very short and had brown hair that was bobbed at her chin.
  • She pulled the straw out and twisted her helmet off, revealing a teenage girl with round glasses, bobbed brown hair and bright smiling eyes.
  • Marya shook her head, her neatly bobbed dark hair brushing against high cheekbones.
2 [no object] Ride on a bobsled.
Example sentences
  • Initially, though, people came to the Alps for their health, for skating, for bobbing, for being seen and - only marginally - for skiing.

Origen

late Middle English (denoting a bunch or cluster): of unknown origin.

More
  • Short words are often the hardest to pin down, and this is the case with bob, which has many uses. Some imply ‘short’; for example, the hairstyle, which became fashionable in the 1920s. Before that people had used bob for a horse's docked tail, a short bunch of hair or curls, and a short wig, and the bob in bobcat (late 19th century), bobsleigh (mid 19th century), and bobtail (mid 16th century) also means ‘short’.

    Another set of uses involves a quick, short movement. People and things bob up and down, and boxers bob and weave. The British bob, ‘a shilling’, dating from the late 18th century, does not appear to be related to any of these, and its origin remains a mystery.

    Bob's your uncle, used to draw attention to the ease with which something can be done, is from the pet form of the name Robert. The Robert in question may have been Lord Salisbury, who in 1887 gave the important post of Chief Secretary for Ireland to his nephew, Arthur Balfour, who was only 39 at the time. The problem with this suggestion is that the earliest recorded examples do not appear until the 1930s, around 50 years after the incident in question. However, we do know that the British bobby comes from Sir Robert Peel, British Home Secretary from 1828–30, who established the Metropolitan Police. The old-fashioned term peelers for policemen also comes from his name.

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Hay 4 definiciones de bob en inglés:

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bob3

División en sílabas: bob
British informal

sustantivo (plural igual)

1A shilling.
Example sentences
  • Now 72, his first taste of the life was as a boy when he'd earn ‘two bob or a shilling’ for helping out various traders until nine o'clock at night.
  • I was given two bob to have one shilling each way on Dawros.
  • Robinson should invest in a few bob on the Euro lottery.
1.1Used with reference to a moderately large but unspecified amount of money: those vases are worth a few bob
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • It may be worth a few bob in years to come, but that was not the reason I bought it.
  • After this season, they might be worth a bob or two as a memorial souvenir.
  • You'll find a lot of beer cans, unless you can tune out aluminium, but you'll pick up an interesting selection of lost property and a few bob in coins.

Origen

late 18th century: of unknown origin.

More
  • Short words are often the hardest to pin down, and this is the case with bob, which has many uses. Some imply ‘short’; for example, the hairstyle, which became fashionable in the 1920s. Before that people had used bob for a horse's docked tail, a short bunch of hair or curls, and a short wig, and the bob in bobcat (late 19th century), bobsleigh (mid 19th century), and bobtail (mid 16th century) also means ‘short’.

    Another set of uses involves a quick, short movement. People and things bob up and down, and boxers bob and weave. The British bob, ‘a shilling’, dating from the late 18th century, does not appear to be related to any of these, and its origin remains a mystery.

    Bob's your uncle, used to draw attention to the ease with which something can be done, is from the pet form of the name Robert. The Robert in question may have been Lord Salisbury, who in 1887 gave the important post of Chief Secretary for Ireland to his nephew, Arthur Balfour, who was only 39 at the time. The problem with this suggestion is that the earliest recorded examples do not appear until the 1930s, around 50 years after the incident in question. However, we do know that the British bobby comes from Sir Robert Peel, British Home Secretary from 1828–30, who established the Metropolitan Police. The old-fashioned term peelers for policemen also comes from his name.

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Hay 4 definiciones de bob en inglés:

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bob4

División en sílabas: bob

sustantivo

1A change of order in bell-ringing.
Example sentences
  • This table illustrates how you will be affected if the conductor calls a Bob or Single.
1.1Used in names of change-ringing methods: plain bob bob minor
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • I must try and understand ‘hunting’ and get a proper plain bob going.
  • In this session we will be looking at the calling positions in Plain Bob Doubles and other doubles methods and we will deal with the fundamental effect of bobs on the coursing order which underpins the whole of what comes later.

Origen

late 17th century: perhaps connected with bob1 in the noun sense 'sudden movement up and down'.

More
  • Short words are often the hardest to pin down, and this is the case with bob, which has many uses. Some imply ‘short’; for example, the hairstyle, which became fashionable in the 1920s. Before that people had used bob for a horse's docked tail, a short bunch of hair or curls, and a short wig, and the bob in bobcat (late 19th century), bobsleigh (mid 19th century), and bobtail (mid 16th century) also means ‘short’.

    Another set of uses involves a quick, short movement. People and things bob up and down, and boxers bob and weave. The British bob, ‘a shilling’, dating from the late 18th century, does not appear to be related to any of these, and its origin remains a mystery.

    Bob's your uncle, used to draw attention to the ease with which something can be done, is from the pet form of the name Robert. The Robert in question may have been Lord Salisbury, who in 1887 gave the important post of Chief Secretary for Ireland to his nephew, Arthur Balfour, who was only 39 at the time. The problem with this suggestion is that the earliest recorded examples do not appear until the 1930s, around 50 years after the incident in question. However, we do know that the British bobby comes from Sir Robert Peel, British Home Secretary from 1828–30, who established the Metropolitan Police. The old-fashioned term peelers for policemen also comes from his name.

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