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bombardier

División en sílabas: bom·bar·dier
Pronunciación: /ˌbämbə(r)ˈdir
 
/

Definición de bombardier en inglés:

sustantivo

1A member of a bomber crew in the US Air Force responsible for sighting and releasing bombs.
Example sentences
  • After World War II begins, Zinn decides to enlist in the Air Force as a bombardier even though his navy yard job would have provided an exemption.
  • Here we were subjected to another physical and now had to take a battery of tests to determine whether we would be pilots, navigators or bombardiers.
  • Rather, the aircraft dropped it as a normal bomb, then the bombardier guided its steep descent by radio remote control.
2A rank of noncommissioned officer in certain Canadian and British artillery regiments, equivalent to corporal.
Example sentences
  • Equivalent ranks in the Royal Artillery are lance-bombardier and bombardier, harking back to the ancient rank of bombardier, a species of trained artilleryman.
  • Mr Hornby, a bombardier in the Royal Artillery during the Second World War, was ordered on a perilous mission while acting as a dispatch rider in Italy.
  • Harold Ings, 86, a bombardier with the Royal Artillery was one of the soldiers whose unit was surrounded by Germans in occupied France.

Origen

mid 16th century (denoting a soldier in charge of a bombard, an early form of cannon): from French, from Old French bombarde 'cannon' (see bombard).

More
  • bomb from (late 17th century):

    In terms of origin, a bomb goes boom (LME from a Germanic root)—the word probably goes right back to Greek bombos ‘booming, humming’. The first bombs, in the late 17th century, are what we would call ‘shells’. Soldiers ignited their fuses and fired them from mortars. Before they were dramatically unexpected events or sexy blondes, bombshells were originally the casings of such devices. Bombs as we know them came to prominence in the First World War. It was not until after the Second World War, though, that to go like a bomb began to be used for ‘to go very fast’, or cost a bomb for ‘be very expensive’. See also atom. A bombardier (late 16th century) gets his name from an early gun called a bombard (Late Middle English), which came from the same source as bomb.

Definición de bombardier en:

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adjective
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