Hay 2 definiciones de broach en inglés:

broach1

Silabificación: broach
Pronunciación: /brōCH
 
/

verbo

[with object]
1Raise (a sensitive or difficult subject) for discussion: he broached the subject he had been avoiding all evening
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Colonel Everson broached the difficult subject with the wizard.
  • But, perhaps with a few revisions, Pacamambo could become one of those unflinching stories that teachers and parents can rely on to broach difficult subjects.
  • It was difficult to broach the subject of empowerment or rehabilitation.
Sinónimos
bring up, raise, introduce, talk about, mention, touch on, air
2Pierce (a cask) to draw liquor.
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • No barrel was broached at this year's Oktoberfest, since host Ina couldn't find the hammer.
  • Only St-Joseph and that paler shadow Crozes-Hermitage can sensibly be broached within their first five years.
  • Pattaya Mail's Peter Malhotra broached the ceremonial keg while muttering the immortal words ‘Ozapft is’ (the keg is tapped).
2.1Open and start using the contents of (a bottle or other container).
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • I hope they broach their bottles, because the whisky, with its honey and praline richness, deserves it.
  • Hesitated before the bathroom mirror and then, feeling slightly ridiculous, broached a bottle of cologne-for-men which Susan had given for the previous Christmas.
  • With the directors of the hospital surrounding him, plus the mayor of Pattaya, Pairat Suthithamrongsawat, the ceremonial bottle of bubbly was broached on the dais and the award acknowledged in fine style.
3 [no object] (Of a fish or sea mammal) rise through the water and break the surface: the salmon broach, then fall to slap the water
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • A dozen of us watch five sperm whales broach, and then hyperventilate like marathoners on the starting line, filling every air-bearing cell with oxygen.
  • He's seen whales broach within yards of his kayak.
  • Outsiders think we locals are jaded by the natural wonder of this place but the truth is, when a whale broaches, we glare like tourists.

Origen

Middle English: from Old French brochier, based on Latin brocchus, broccus 'projecting'. The earliest recorded sense was 'prick with spurs', part of the general meaning 'pierce with something sharp', from which sense 2 arose in late Middle English. sense 1, a figurative use of this, dates from the late 16th century.

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Palabra del día internecine
Pronunciación: ˌɪntəˈniːsʌɪn
adjective
destructive to both sides in a conflict

Hay 2 definiciones de broach en inglés:

broach2

Silabificación: broach
Pronunciación: /brōCH
 
/
Nautical

verbo

[no object] (also broach to)
(Of a ship with the wind on the quarter) veer and pitch forward because of bad steering or a sea hitting the stern, causing it to present a side to the wind and sea, lose steerage, and possibly suffer serious damage: we had broached badly, side on to the wind and sea the ship would have broached to if the captain had not sprung to the wheel
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • As one big sea washed us too far around back into the wind, with that weight of sail above, we broached.
  • After dark, however, the wind rose, and I spent a hairy night giving all my attention to the helm to keep the boat from broaching and turning dangerously crosswise to the rising seas.
  • Yes, but I don't want us to broach to and go over if the wind shifts.

sustantivo

Volver al principio  
A sudden and hazardous veering or pitching of a ship.
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • The boat commenced surfing down the face of each new wave, at high speed, and I had to steer the boat aggressively to prevent a broach.
  • If this can be offset by rudder action the boat will remain on course, otherwise sail adjustment is necessary to prevent a broach.
  • The rudder sits in the outflow of the keel and is called upon to provide lift at very small angles of attack and not stall when required to prevent a broach.

Origen

early 18th century: of unknown origin.