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canna

División en sílabas: can·na
Pronunciación: /ˈkanə
 
/
(also canna lily)

Definición de canna en inglés:

sustantivo

A lilylike, tropical American plant with bright flowers and ornamental straplike leaves.
Example sentences
  • For especially dramatic container plants, try the summer flower bulbs, for starters: tuberose, oxalis, agapanthus, cannas, begonias, dahlias, caladiums, lilies, or elephant ears.
  • Semi-tropical natives such as dahlias, gladioli, begonias, canna, caladium, elephant ears, oxalis and other tender summer-flowering bulbs will not make it through the winter outside of the warmest climate zones.
  • After frost kills their foliage, dig up callas, cannas, dahlias, gladiolus, tuberous begonias, and other tender bulbs, Dry off the bulbs and pack them in vermiculite or sterile potting soil.

Origen

from modern Latin, from Latin canna 'cane, reed' (see cane).

More
  • cannon from (Late Middle English):

    This large heavy piece of artillery derives its name from French canon, from Italian cannone ‘large tube’, from canna ‘cane, reed, tube’. Soldiers have been called cannon fodder, no more than material to be used up in war, since the late 19th century—the expression is a translation of German Kanonenfutter. Shakespeare did encapsulate a similar idea much earlier, with his phrase ‘food for powder’ in Henry IV Part 1. Canna or its Greek equivalent kanna is the base of a number of other words in English, as well as giving us the name of the canna lily (mid 17th century), which gets its name from the shape of its leaves. Some reflect the use of the plants for making things, some their hollow stems. Canes (Middle English) are basically the same plant. Canister (Late Middle English) was originally a basket from Latin canistrum ‘basket for bread, fruit, or flowers’, from Greek kanastron ‘wicker basket’, from kanna. Canal (Late Middle English) and channel (Middle English) both come via French from Latin canalis ‘pipe, groove, channel’ from canna, and share a source with the Italian pasta cannelloni (mid 19th century). The medical cannula (late 17th century) was originally a ‘small reed’; a canyon (mid 19th century) is from Spanish cañón ‘tube’ from canna.

Definición de canna en:

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