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carrion

División en sílabas: car·ri·on
Pronunciación: /ˈkerēən
 
/

Definición de carrion en inglés:

sustantivo

The decaying flesh of dead animals.
Example sentences
  • A survey of fox dens showed that the vast majority of lamb carcasses found in them were carrion ie. dead before being taken by the fox.
  • Diversionary feeding involves leaving dead rats and other carrion on the moor for the harriers to eat.
  • Biologists, however, have reported some bees taking advantage of other resources, such as animal droppings and carrion.

Origen

Middle English: from Anglo-Norman French and Old Northern French caroine, caroigne, Old French charoigne, based on Latin caro 'flesh'.

More
  • carnival from (mid 16th century):

    Originally a carnival was, in Roman Catholic countries, the period before Lent, a time of public merrymaking and festivities. It comes from medieval Latin carnelevamen ‘Shrovetide’. The base elements of the Latin word are caro, carn- ‘flesh’ and levare ‘to put away’, before the meat-free fasting of Lent began. There is a popular belief that carnival is from carne vale, ‘farewell, meat’, but this is mistaken. Other flesh-related words that come from caro include carnivorous (late 16th century), carnage (early 17th century), carnation (late 16th century) (from the flower's ‘fleshy’ colour), carrion (Middle English), and incarnation (Middle English).

Words that rhyme with carrion

Carian, clarion, Marian

Definición de carrion en:

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