Definición de coerce en inglés:

coerce

Silabificación: co·erce
Pronunciación: /kōˈərs
 
/

verbo

[with object]
1Persuade (an unwilling person) to do something by using force or threats: they were coerced into silence
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Once she is coerced into signing adoption papers, she's bundled out of the way and into the convent to save her parents further humiliation.
  • His client still insists that she was coerced into committing the blackmail offences by her co-defendant.
  • Despite repeated warnings from the police and the relatives about not letting strangers in she was just coerced into it.
Sinónimos
force, compel, oblige, browbeat, bludgeon, bully, threaten, intimidate, dragoon, twist someone's arm
informal railroad, squeeze, lean on
1.1Obtain (something) by using force or threats: their confessions were allegedly coerced by torture
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Those detained face beatings and other forms of torture, aimed at coercing confessions or information about rebel forces.
  • So I guess I can rule out the possibility of coercing a drunken confession about how much you love me?
  • The alleged intention was to coerce privatisation of the national oil company into the hands of the foreign investor group.

Origen

late Middle English: from Latin coercere 'restrain', from co- 'jointly, together' + arcere 'restrain'.

Derivativos

coercible

adjetivo
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • When one is weak and the other strong, when one is coercible by virtue of this weakness and the other holds all the cards, competition inevitably becomes exploitation.
  • There can surely no longer be any justification for a law that treats wives as being more coercible than unmarried women.
  • A person already in jail is not shocked and coercible as someone newly arrested might be.