Definición de congenial en inglés:

congenial

Silabificación: con·gen·ial
Pronunciación: /kənˈjēnēəl
 
/

adjetivo

1(Of a person) pleasant because of a personality, qualities, or interests that are similar to one’s own: his need for some congenial company
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • The reason he had the respect of such a wide range of his younger peers was the quality of his poetry - not just his congenial personality.
  • It's always the case when you get a bunch of bloggers in the room: as a rule they are the smartest, most congenial people you could hope to meet.
  • A congenial man with a neatly trimmed white beard, he's a classic civic booster who loves to extol his hometown's virtues.
Sinónimos
1.1(Of a thing) pleasant or agreeable because suited to one’s taste or inclination: he went back to a climate more congenial to his cold stony soul
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • It's not a portrait that will be entirely congenial to either his critics or his allies, though in many respects I think he comes off quite well.
  • No presumption has ever existed in favor of a judging style congenial to ‘moderates.’
  • What he has to say may be congenial to the beliefs of many, but one can't overlook the feeling that the relations between his ideas and evidence sometimes feel slight.
Sinónimos
pleasant, pleasing, agreeable, enjoyable, pleasurable, nice, appealing, satisfying, gratifying, delightful, relaxing, welcoming, hospitable;
suitable, well suited, favorable

Derivativos

congeniality

Pronunciación: /-ˌjēnēˈalitē/
sustantivo
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • It's a very thought-provoking activity and breeds congeniality.
  • It is important for parents to cultivate an enlightened and tender congeniality about such matters, otherwise they risk transferring unhealthy attitudes to their children.
  • By adding in some component of intelligence or false congeniality, the interview steers you away from understanding the contest for what it really is - a valuation of the female body.

congenially

adverbio
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • The producer in charge of the audio recording kept complaining (in the nicest possible way) that we were slowing down - which was kind-of inevitable with our conductor, who has been known to congenially protract verses in the past.
  • Do you have the impression that business journalists are still dependent, perhaps overly dependent, on analysts and experts who often turn out to be wrong and congenially bullish about corporations and stocks?
  • One signal that a new volume of American poetry resonates congenially, from the first poem to the stanza just short of the obligatory blank white pages, is that no one poem insists itself as the signature work.

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Palabra del día demoralize
Pronunciación: dɪˈmɒrəlʌɪz
verb
cause (someone) to lose confidence or hope