Share this entry

Share this page

deploy

División en sílabas: de·ploy
Pronunciación: /dəˈploi
 
/

Definición de deploy en inglés:

verbo

[with object]
1Move (troops or equipment) into position for military action: forces were deployed at strategic locations
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Once the strategic lift deploys Army forces to where they are required, tactical logistics moves to the forefront.
  • The Legion was often deployed in hopeless military situations.
  • Profiting from a mutiny, the rebel forces deployed their troops rapidly and cut the country virtually in two.
Sinónimos
position, station, post, place, install, locate, situate, site, establish;
distribute, dispose
1.1 [no object] (Of troops) move into position for military action: the air force began to deploy forward
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • When the colonial militia deployed at Concord, the uniform was work clothes.
  • The armies deployed conventionally, in the centre a phalanx of pike-armed heavy infantry flanked on both sides by cavalry.
  • They simply could not bring themselves to believe that they would attack, and as a result they adopted the interpretation that their army was deploying only for an exercise.
1.2Bring into effective action; utilize: they are not always able to deploy this skill
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • However, the trustees do have a responsibility to ensure that the centre's income is deployed in the most effective manner.
  • Yet the silences, so effective when they are deployed, are largely absent.
  • If she can deploy her record-breaking resources to maximum effect, this will ensure the next inspectorate report makes for happier reading.
Sinónimos
use, utilize, employ, take advantage of, exploit;
bring into service, call on, turn to, resort to

Origen

late 18th century: from French déployer, from Latin displicare and late Latin deplicare 'unfold or explain', from dis-, de- 'un-' + plicare 'to fold'. Compare with display.

More
  • display from (Middle English):

    The early meaning of this was ‘unfurl (a banner or sail), unfold’. The word comes via Old French from Latin displicare ‘scatter, disperse’, which came to mean ‘unfold’ in medieval Latin and was also the source of deploy (late 18th century). In English the notion of ‘unfurling’ led to ‘causing to notice’. Splay (Middle English) was originally a shortening of display.

Share this entry

Share this page

 

¿Qué te llama la atención de esta palabra o frase?

Comments that don't adhere to our Community Guidelines may be moderated or removed.

Obtenga más de Oxford Dictionaries

Suscribirse para eliminar anuncios y acceder a los recursos premium

Palabra del día raconteur
Pronunciación: ˌrakɒnˈtəː
noun
a person who tells anecdotes skilfully and amusingly…