Hay 3 definiciones de gall en inglés:

Share this entry

Share this page

gall1

División en sílabas: gall
Pronunciación: /ɡôl
 
/

sustantivo

1Bold, impudent behavior: the bank had the gall to demand a fee
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • I can't believe we have such ungrateful whiners in this place that have the hide and gall to call themselves Aussies.
  • I have been in politics a while - not long enough, obviously - but I have been in politics a while and I have seen some examples of impertinence, cheek, and gall, but that last speech beats them all.
  • What a hat full of horsefeathers; what a hoary hunk of chutzpah; what a grotesque, galloping glob of gall this guy is!
Sinónimos
2The contents of the gallbladder; bile (proverbial for its bitterness).
Example sentences
  • In central Ontario, eight species of parasitoids and a Periclistus inquiline are associated with this gall.
  • And when they were come unto a place called Golgotha, that is to say, a place of a skull, They gave Him Vinegar to drink mingled with gall: and when He had tasted thereof, He would not drink.
  • The result of Raychel's beating is directly carried over to the Roman soldier forcing Jesus to drink gall.
Sinónimos
bitterness, resentment, rancor, bile, spleen, malice, spite, spitefulness, malignity, venom, vitriol, poison
2.1An animal’s gallbladder.
Example sentences
  • They gave me also gall for my meat; and in my thirst they gave me vinegar to drink.
  • Whoever killed Russell's bears was not out poaching gall, Pavel believed.
  • Dried and sold as an aphrodisiac and cure-all in Asia, Russia, and North America, bear gall has long been treasure for poachers.
2.2Used to refer to something bitter or cruel: accept life’s gall without blaming somebody else
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • It's always a bit crushing when you lose something that was yours but there is a special bitter gall when that thing is logging your progress in a 10,000 a day stepathon.
  • How quickly I fall back to my evil ways when I force You to drink the bitter gall of mankind's sin - instead of refreshing water that will temporarily soothe Your thirsty and battered body.

Origen

Old English gealla (denoting bile), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch gal, German Galle 'gall', from an Indo-European root shared by Greek kholē and Latin fel 'bile'.

More
  • yellow from (Old English):

    As with other colour words such as auburn and brown, the root of yellow probably referred to a wider range of colours than the modern word. It shares an ancestor with gold ( see golden), but is also related to gall (Old English), bile (mid 17th century), and the final element of melancholy, all of which derive from the greenish colour of bile. The yellow egg yolk (Old English), which could be spelt yelk into the 17th century, was also related to yellow. In the 17th century yellow rather than green was the colour of jealousy, possibly with the idea of a jealous person being ‘jaundiced’ or bitter. The word jaundice (Middle English) is from Old French jaune ‘yellow’, from the symptomatic yellowish complexion. Yellow is now associated with cowardice, a link that began in the 1850s in the USA. Since the 1920s a coward has been said to be yellow-bellied or a yellow-belly.

Share this entry

Share this page

 

Obtenga más de Oxford Dictionaries

Suscribirse para eliminar anuncios y acceder a los recursos premium

Hay 3 definiciones de gall en inglés:

Share this entry

Share this page

gall2

División en sílabas: gall
Pronunciación: /ɡôl
 
/

sustantivo

1Annoyance; irritation: he imagined Linda’s gall as she found herself still married and not rich
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Learning that his quarry had given him a slip a glowering devil seemed to rage within the king's heart, raising dark and savage gall.
Sinónimos
irritation, irritant, annoyance, vexation, nuisance, provocation, bother, torment, plague, thorn in one's side/flesh
informal aggravation, bore, headache, hassle, pain, pain in the neck, pain in the butt
2(Especially of a horse) a sore on the skin made by chafing.

verbo

[with object] Volver al principio  
1Make (someone) feel annoyed: he knew he was losing, and it galled him
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • It galls me that some people are trying to take full credit for the new hospital now.
  • Yes indeed, and clearly that's galling the people who are holding those three Italian hostages, originally four.
  • What is galling most people about the situation is that it was instigated by our own Minister who seems to be blaming everyone from his own Fisheries Officers, Europe and fishermen's so called lack of flexibility.
Sinónimos
irritate, annoy, vex, anger, infuriate, exasperate, irk, pique, nettle, put out, displease, antagonize, get on someone's nerves, make someone's hackles rise, rub the wrong way
informal aggravate, peeve, miff, rile, needle, get (to), bug, get someone's goat, get/put someone's back up, get someone's dander up, drive mad/crazy, drive round/around the bend, drive up the wall, tee off, tick off, rankle
2Make sore by rubbing: the straps galled their shoulders

Origen

Old English gealle 'sore on a horse', perhaps related to gall1; superseded in Middle English by forms from Middle Low German or Middle Dutch.

More
  • yellow from (Old English):

    As with other colour words such as auburn and brown, the root of yellow probably referred to a wider range of colours than the modern word. It shares an ancestor with gold ( see golden), but is also related to gall (Old English), bile (mid 17th century), and the final element of melancholy, all of which derive from the greenish colour of bile. The yellow egg yolk (Old English), which could be spelt yelk into the 17th century, was also related to yellow. In the 17th century yellow rather than green was the colour of jealousy, possibly with the idea of a jealous person being ‘jaundiced’ or bitter. The word jaundice (Middle English) is from Old French jaune ‘yellow’, from the symptomatic yellowish complexion. Yellow is now associated with cowardice, a link that began in the 1850s in the USA. Since the 1920s a coward has been said to be yellow-bellied or a yellow-belly.

Share this entry

Share this page

 

Hay 3 definiciones de gall en inglés:

Share this entry

Share this page

gall3

División en sílabas: gall
Pronunciación: /ɡôl
 
/

sustantivo

1An abnormal growth formed on plants and trees, especially oaks, in response to the presence of insect larvae, mites, or fungi.
Example sentences
  • In early spring, these aphids form pouch-shaped galls on the hybrids' leaves; living and breeding within the galls, the insects feed on the trees' nutritious sap stream.
  • Herbivorous attack was estimated by the number of attacked leaves and percentage of leaf area damaged, while gall-forming insect attacks were estimated from the number of leaves with galls and number of galls per individual plant.
  • The midge is an ephemeral 2-3 mm insect whose larva induces a gall on young unfurled S. viminalis leaves.
1.1 [as modifier] Denoting insects or mites that produce galls: gall flies
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • I chose gall insects, made drawings and sent in specimens with my essay.
  • However, this parasitoid was completely absent from all sampled gall beetle populations.
  • To combat it, agricultural agencies began to introduce gall flies of the genus Urophoro in the 1970s.

Origen

Middle English: via Old French from Latin galla.

More
  • yellow from (Old English):

    As with other colour words such as auburn and brown, the root of yellow probably referred to a wider range of colours than the modern word. It shares an ancestor with gold ( see golden), but is also related to gall (Old English), bile (mid 17th century), and the final element of melancholy, all of which derive from the greenish colour of bile. The yellow egg yolk (Old English), which could be spelt yelk into the 17th century, was also related to yellow. In the 17th century yellow rather than green was the colour of jealousy, possibly with the idea of a jealous person being ‘jaundiced’ or bitter. The word jaundice (Middle English) is from Old French jaune ‘yellow’, from the symptomatic yellowish complexion. Yellow is now associated with cowardice, a link that began in the 1850s in the USA. Since the 1920s a coward has been said to be yellow-bellied or a yellow-belly.

Share this entry

Share this page

 

¿Qué te llama la atención de esta palabra o frase?

Comments that don't adhere to our Community Guidelines may be moderated or removed.