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voluble

División en sílabas: vol·u·ble
Pronunciación: /ˈvälyəbəl
 
/

Definición de voluble en inglés:

adjetivo

Speaking or spoken incessantly and fluently: she was as voluble as her husband was silent
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • He is able; he is voluble; he's, I think, a very decent man, but again the campaign I think has not been there for him.
  • She is voluble about the support she has received from her family and friends, and the Cincinnati Zoo, whose help in sustaining the project has been crucial.
  • Nervous PR folk and man wielding a hair brush flutter around her nervously as the stunning actress is seated and rapidly surrounded by her voluble fans.
Sinónimos
talkative, loquacious, garrulous, verbose, wordy, chatty, gossipy, effusive, gushing, forthcoming, conversational, communicative, expansive;
articulate, fluent
informal mouthy, motormouthed, gabby, gassy, windy, talky

Origen

late 16th century: from French, or from Latin volubilis, from volvere 'to roll'. Earlier use in late Middle English included the senses 'rotating around an axis' and 'having a tendency to change', also meanings of the Latin word.

More
  • revolve from (Late Middle English):

    The Latin verb volvere had the sense ‘to turn round, roll, tumble’; add re- in front and you get meaning such as ‘turn back, turn round’. This is the basic idea behind revolve and its offshoots: revolution (Late Middle English) which only came to mean the overthrow of a government in 1600, and which developed the form rev for the turning over of a motor in the early 20th century; and revolt (mid 16th century) initially used politically, and developing the sense ‘to make someone turn away in disgust’ in the mid 18th century. The sense ‘roll, tumble’ of volvere developed into vault, both for the sense ‘leap’ (mid 16th century) which came via Old French volter ‘to turn (a horse), gambol’, and for the arch that springs up to form a roof (Middle English). The turning sense is found in voluble (Middle English) initially used to mean ‘turning’, but was used for words rolling out of the mouth by the late 16th century, and in volume (Late Middle English) originally a rolled scroll rather than a book, but with the sense ‘quantity’ coming from an obsolete meaning ‘size or extent (of a book)’ by the early 16th century. Convoluted (late 18th century) comes from convolvere ‘rolled together, intertwined’ (the plant convolvulus, from the same root, that climbs by turning its stem around a support already existed as a word in Latin, where it could also mean a caterpillar that rolls itself up in a leaf); while devolve (Late Middle English) comes from its opposite devolvere ‘to unroll, roll down’; and involve (Late Middle English) from involvere ‘to roll in’.

Derivados

volubleness

1
sustantivo
Example sentences
  • He gave the language fixity, volubleness, grace, beauty, simplicity, and directness.

volubly

2
adverbio
Example sentences
  • Every single morning newspaper and all the weeklies were spread on the kitchen table, with Bernard alternately lapsing into rage, disgust, amazement, or amusement, all volubly shared with me.
  • Of course, in order to be taken seriously as a scholar while you do much more than your colleagues in the public arena, much more volubly, you must also maintain enormous intellectual credibility.
  • I've always wondered why the people I know who are most into computers seem to be the ones who are most likely to swear at them volubly.

Words that rhyme with voluble

soluble

Definición de voluble en:

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