Traducción de brain en español:

brain

Pronunciación: /breɪn/

noun/nombre

  • 1 (organ) cerebro (masculine) the human brain el cerebro humano
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • This occurs as a result of damage to soft brain tissue when the brain rattles against the skull.
    • It is a precious tissue like the nervous tissue of the brain, spinal cord and heart muscle, as it cannot heal like the other tissues.
    • Stem cells are harvested from bone marrow, umbilical cords, the brain and spinal cord and other tissues.
  • 2 (intellect) she's got a good brain es muy inteligente his brain is still as agile as ever la cabeza le sigue funcionando perfectamente to be bored out of one's brain (British English/inglés británico) [colloquial/familiar] estar* aburrido como una ostra [colloquial/familiar] to have sth on the brain [colloquial/familiar] tener* algo metido en la cabeza she's got that boy on the brain tiene a ese chico metido en la cabeza, tiene el seso sorbido por ese chico [colloquial/familiar]
  • 3 (clever person) cerebro (masculine) the best brains in the country los mejores cerebros del país (before noun/delante del nombre) the brain drain la fuga de cerebros see also brains
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • Could this be the big mo for Ben, Mena and Anil, the brains and the energy behind Typepad and Movable Type?
    • It's time to ask Tommy Champion, the brains and energy behind this event some questions.
    • Ansett liberated them from the old firm and set them up in KordaMentha (putting the brains of the outfit up front there).

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • [colloquial/familiar] romperle* la crisma a [colloquial/familiar] I'll brain you if you don't shut up! ¡te rompo la crisma si no te callas! [colloquial/familiar]

Definición de brain en:

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Palabra del día sigla
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abbreviation …
HECHO CULTURAL

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.