Hay 2 traducciones de chuck en español:

chuck1

Pronunciación: /tʃʌk/

n

  • 1 uncountable/no numerable [Cookery/Cocina]corte de carne vacuna del cuarto delantero
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • Shred about 10 ounces cooked beef brisket or chuck.
    • Cut the pork, venison, chuck steak and kielbasa sausage into 2.5cm / 1in cubes, then toss together in the flour.
    • Similarly, the steak and kidney pie is now made with best blade steak rather than chuck beef.
  • 2 countable/numerable [Technology/Tecnología] portabrocas (masculine) (before noun/delante del nombre) chuck key llave (feminine) de sujeción
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • One of the challenges of crank grinding relates to clamping the workpiece in the chuck so that the crank pin can be cylindrically ground.
    • To make the feet, the turner placed an offset chuck on the lathe and turned this part of the leg along a second axis.
    • Other keyless devices consist of rotating knobs (similar to a chuck on a drill) on the slide mechanism.
  • 3 countable/numerable (playful pat) palmadita (feminine)
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • But let's be clear there - a chuck under the chin is quite sufficient to convince me that affection can last the distance.
    • He gave the toddler a chuck under the chin which earned him a toothy grin.
    • Kelly reached forward and gave her a token chuck under the chin.
  • 4 (as term of endearment) (British English/inglés británico) [dialect/dialecto], cariño (masculine)
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • I was wearing my tattered skirt with a black belt, my chucks, and a really weird purple Sex pistols shirt that I found in the garbage somewhere.

Definición de chuck en:

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Palabra del día juerga
f
partying …
HECHO CULTURAL

Bullfighting is popular in Spain and in Mexico, Colombia, Peru, and Venezuela. For some Spaniards it is crucial to Spanish identity. The season runs from March to October in Spain, from November to March in Latin America.

Hay 2 traducciones de chuck en español:

chuck2

vt

  • 2 (stroke) to chuck sb under the chin darle* una palmadita en la barbilla a algn
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • ‘You won't go short!’ she says to her son in baby talk, chucking him under the chin.
    • Nicholas laughed and lightly chucked Susan under the chin.
    • She smiled wickedly and chucked him under the chin.

Verbos con partícula

chuck away

verb + object + adverb, verb + adverb + object/verbo + complemento + adverbio, verbo + adverbio + complemento
1.1 (squander, waste) [colloquial/familiar] [money] derrochar, despilfarrar, tirar; [opportunity] desperdiciar 1.2chuck out 1 1

chuck in

verb + object + adverb, verb + adverb + object/verbo + complemento + adverbio, verbo + adverbio + complemento
[job/studies] (British English/inglés británico) [colloquial/familiar], dejar, mandar al diablo [colloquial/familiar] I'm going to chuck it (all) in voy a mandar todo al diablo [colloquial/familiar]

chuck out

[colloquial/familiar]
verb + object + adverb, verb + adverb + object/verbo + complemento + adverbio, verbo + adverbio + complemento 1.1 (get rid of) [clothes/rubbish] tirar, botar (Latin America except River Plate area/América Latina excepto Río de la Plata) 1.2 (reject) (British English/inglés británico) [plan/suggestion] rechazar* 1.1verb + object + adverb, verb + adverb + object/verbo + complemento + adverbio, verbo + adverbio + complemento (expel) echar

chuck up

verb + object + adverb, verb + adverb + object/verbo + complemento + adverbio, verbo + adverbio + complemento (British English/inglés británico) chuck in 1.1verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio (vomit) [slang/argot] devolver*, lanzar* [colloquial/familiar], guacarear (Mexico/México) [colloquial/familiar], buitrear (Chile, Peru/Chile, Perú) [colloquial/familiar]

Definición de chuck en:

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Palabra del día juerga
f
partying …
HECHO CULTURAL

Bullfighting is popular in Spain and in Mexico, Colombia, Peru, and Venezuela. For some Spaniards it is crucial to Spanish identity. The season runs from March to October in Spain, from November to March in Latin America.