Traducción de communion en español:

communion

Pronunciación: /kəˈmjuːnjən/

noun/nombre

  • 1 [Religion/Religión] 1.1 uncountable/no numerable (Eucharist)
    (Communion)
    Holy Communion la Santa or Sagrada Comunión to take Communion recibir la comunión or la eucaristía, comulgar* (before noun/delante del nombre) communion cup cáliz (masculine) communion rail comulgatorio (masculine) communion service comunión (feminine)
    1.2 countable/numerable (denomination) confesión (feminine)
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • He courageously describes the discrimination and harm often visited upon one of Christianity's oldest communions - the Coptic Church.
    • This document still serves as a primary point of reference for Anglican dialogue with other Christian communions.
    • The advert says, ‘We are Christians, from different communions.’
  • 2 uncountable/no numerable (exchange of ideas, fellowship) [formal] comunión (feminine)
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • I am in exclusive intimate spiritual communion with each of my devotees.
    • The sheer joy of that intimate communion with nature; the contented peace we discover on the banks of running waters - that's what it's really all about.
    • Their imaginations are dominated by the ghosts of the past, in intimate communion with the shimmering world of the dead.
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • This relation is not one of appropriation, possession, or passive representation of knowledge, but of communion and co-creative participation.
    • Mutual participation or communion is an integral feature of Christian salvation.
    • Making, breaking, and distributing bread carried profound connotations of friendship, communion, giving, sharing, justice.

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HECHO CULTURAL

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.