Traducción de crystallize en español:

crystallize

Pronunciación: /ˈkrɪstəlaɪz/

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

  • 1.1 [Chemistry/Química] [Geology/Geología] cristalizarse* to crystallize out cristalizar* 1.2 (take shape) [plan/idea/interest] cristalizarse* to crystallize into sth cristalizarse* en algo

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • 1.1 [Chemistry/Química] [Geology/Geología] cristalizar* 1.2 (give shape to) [idea/plan] materializar*
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • A good briefing can save you hours of legwork and days of phone- and email-tag, particularly when you want information that can't be crystallized into a quick, clear question.
    • His ideas never crystallized into a system: he held that political thought had to be as mobile and protean as its object.
    • His smile crystallized into a frozen grin, the part in his hair fracturing to the very foundations of his Brylcream.
    1.3 [Cookery/Cocina] [fruit] confitar, escarchar, abrillantar (River Plate area/Río de la Plata) , cristalizar* (Mexico/México)
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • As the solution cools, quinine sulfate crystallizes out.
    • Such solutions are unstable and the addition of a tiny amount of the solute will cause all of the excess solute to crystallize out of solution.
    • At regular intervals they remove samples and measure how many of the C triglycerides in the liquid oil phase crystallise out.
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • If you're going to crystallise the rose petals for the topping, simply paint each one with egg white and dip in caster sugar, coating well.
    • Fleurs de sucre are crystallized flower petals or berries, beautifully packaged up in tall glass tubes.
    • The sliced lemon added on day 2 also becomes crystallized and very yummy as its own treat.

Definición de crystallize en:

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Palabra del día sigla
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abbreviation …
HECHO CULTURAL

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.