Traducción de cult en español:

cult

Pronunciación: /kʌlt/

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 (belief, worship) culto (masculine)
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • The pre-Christian religion of the Fijians was both animistic and polytheistic, and included a cult of chiefly ancestors.
    • The cult of the ancestors is practiced among many of the ethnic groups.
    • As he notes, cults of holy images have been the subject of a long debate in Christianity.
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • The loss of life was terrible, but it was no more than one in a series of occasional tragedies caused by the misguided beliefs of cults and their members.
    • Will witches, cults, and strange religions soon get taxpayers' dollars?
    • Society suffers from dangerous sects and cults, militia movements, media control, and misrepresentations of psychiatric treatment and mental disorders.
    1.2 (sect) secta (feminine) 1.3 (craze, obsessive interest) culto (masculine) (before noun/delante del nombre) cult figure ídolo (masculine) cult movie película (feminine) de culto
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • The fellow with the Village People mustache, who wears a white dress shirt and tie, is being marketed as a cult of personality.
    • Does it bother you that there's a cult of personality built up around him?
    • Or perhaps they center too much on the cult of personality from the opposing side.
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • It did remarkably well at the box office, and garnered a strong cult following among college-age Americans.
    • The company's ads have gained a cult following among advertisers and laymen alike.
    • Shooting took about a month and the film became a cult classic among many people.

Definición de cult en:

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Palabra del día sigla
f
abbreviation …
HECHO CULTURAL

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.