Traducción de dealer en español:

dealer

Pronunciación: /ˈdiːlər; ˈdiːlə(r)/

noun/nombre

  • 1 1.1 (trader)dealer (in sth) arms/drug dealer traficante (masculine and feminine) de armas/drogas a dealer in livestock un consignatario or tratante de ganado she's a record/car dealer se dedica a la compra-venta de discos/coches visit your local Ford/Hoover dealer visite a su concesionario Ford/representante Hoover más próximo a dealer in stolen goods un reducidor 1.2 [Finance] corredor, (masculine, feminine) de bolsa or de valores foreign currency dealer agente (masculine and feminine) de cambio
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • The edition, which was expected to fetch up to £10,000, was bought by a book dealer in Bristol.
    • Although we bought calves locally for rearing, we sometimes bought them from a dealer in Cheshire.
    • The painting of Calais, being sold by a dealer in Hampshire, was also snapped up for the gallery.
  • 2 [Games/Juegos] the dealer el que da or reparte las cartas
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • At the beginning of the game, the dealer deals to each player until the deck is exhausted.
    • The game begins with the dealer flipping a card face-up in front of the person to his or her left.
    • The early surrender rule allows the player to throw in the hand before the dealer checks the hole card for a Blackjack.

Definición de dealer en:

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Palabra del día sigla
f
abbreviation …
HECHO CULTURAL

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.