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florid

Pronunciación: /ˈflɔːrəd; ˈflɒrɪd/

Traducción de florid en español:

adjective/adjetivo

  • 1.1 (red) [complexion/cheeks] rubicundo
    Oraciones de ejemplo
    • He was a great big fellow with a florid complexion and blue eyes, and was utterly devoid of fear, nothing that came in his direction being too hot for him to handle.
    • His features and florid complexion are all too familiar to readers of The Sunday Times, where he provides the savoury delights in the restaurant pages of Style magazine.
    • Think of high blood pressure - or hypertension as doctors call it - and you probably think headaches, dizzy spells and a florid complexion.
    1.2 (ornate) [decoration/style] recargado; [language] florido
    Oraciones de ejemplo
    • In an age when the life of the spirit is besieged by the excesses of a florid globalism, claimants to sole proprietorship of truth have never been more numerous.
    • It is sad to hear the veteran struggling with Rossini's florid music as the titular Turk, and both buffo baritones are, frankly, provincial.
    • Her gestures, however, can seem too mannered, even by the florid standards of Baroque song recitals.
    Oraciones de ejemplo
    • Expressing ourselves in quite such florid language about what we are is why fingers are pointed at us.
    • That was probably a reaction to the florid language Rothwell used - and an initial response to the content.
    • Some judges and magistrates tend to clothe their remarks in florid language which is likely to appeal to reporters.

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Sherry is produced in an area of chalky soil known as albariza lying between the towns of Puerto de Santa María, Sanlúcar de Barrameda, and Jerez de la Frontera in Cádiz province. It is from Jerez that sherry takes its English name. Sherries, made from grape varieties including Palomino and Pedro Ximénez, are drunk worldwide as an aperitif, and in Spain as an accompaniment to tapas. The styles of jerez vary from the pale fino and manzanilla to the darker aromatic oloroso and amontillado.