Hay 2 traducciones de lacquer en español:

lacquer1

Pronunciación: /ˈlækər; ˈlækə(r)/

n

uncountable or countable/no numerable o numerable
  • 1.1 (varnish) laca (feminine) 1.2 (for nails) esmalte (masculine) de uñas
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • Finish highly detailed natural and stained wood with spray lacquer, shellac or polyurethane.
    • Floors finished with lacquer or shellac are nearly impossible to repair successfully.
    • A primer is then applied to fill in any small holes, followed by a coat of paint and another layer of protective lacquer until the alloys are almost as good as new.
    1.3
    (hair lacquer)
    laca (f) or fijador (m) (para el pelo)

Definición de lacquer en:

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Palabra del día reubicar
vt
to relocate …
HECHO CULTURAL

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.

Hay 2 traducciones de lacquer en español:

lacquer2

vt

  • [wood/surface] laquear, lacar* to lacquer one's nails pintarse las uñas to lacquer one's hair ponerse* laca or fijador en el pelo
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • Most aluminum used in visible parts of appliances is lacquered or otherwise coated, anodized or painted.
    • French and English furniture and Japanese lacquered cabinets grace the room.
    • Despite it's name it actually feels more like a New York bar as they've wisely avoided the usual spread of overly lacquered replica oriental furniture.

Definición de lacquer en:

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Palabra del día reubicar
vt
to relocate …
HECHO CULTURAL

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.