Traducción de liaison en español:

liaison

Pronunciación: /liˈeɪzɑːn; liˈeɪzn; -zɒn/

noun/nombre

  • 1 1.1 uncountable/no numerable (coordination) enlace (masculine), contacto (masculine), coordinación (feminine)
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • Management of toxicities in the community requires close liaison with the hospital team, and severe toxicity requires immediate admission.
    • He said the Institute was putting in place a framework for the resolution of the problem and towards this end, it would work in close liaison with the residents, students, community leaders and the Gardai.
    • On the contrary, ‘lobbying’ must be applied vigorously in close liaison with constituent social movements.
    1.2 countable/numerable (person, official) enlace (masculine), contacto (masculine)
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • If you want to interview someone in particular, see if a media liaison can arrange it for you.
    • This eight-week program trains parents to be active participants and advocates in their children's education and to share these skills as community liaisons.
    • Advisers serve advisees as advocates, guides, group leaders, community builders, liaisons with parents, and evaluation coordinators.
  • 2 countable/numerable (affair) [literary/literario] affaire (masculine), relación (feminine)
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • In desperation, she entered warily into a sexual liaison with an army captain, who offered some promise of economic stability.
    • In 1613, she was accused of having a sexual liaison with a neighbour and to clear her name, went to the Church Court.
    • Above and below, divisions blur and the long-established equilibrium is knocked off balance amid revelations of illicit sexual liaisons and dubious business dealings.

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HECHO CULTURAL

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.