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lively

Pronunciación: /ˈlaɪvli/

Traducción de lively en español:

adjective/adjetivo (-lier, -liest)

  • [place/atmosphere/debate] animado; [music] alegre; [car/engine] con brío; [description/account] vívido he's a lively character es un tipo de lo más animado y alegre they have three lively children tienen tres niños traviesos y llenos de vida lively minds read the Daily Globe la gente con inquietudes lee el Daily Globe they take a lively interest in developments toman un vivo interés en el desarrollo de los asuntos things are getting a bit lively around here las cosas se están poniendo un poco movidas por aquí [colloquial/familiar]
    Example sentences
    • He was so lively and full of energy that it dawned on us that he must have been in some sort of pain for a lot longer than we had thought.
    • Although a lively and outgoing teenager, he lives with the effects of what his father, Greg, termed ‘subtle neurological damage’.
    • Nine-year-old Ricky is described as a lively, active boy who loves reading, swimming, watching TV and playing computer games.
    Example sentences
    • When the fast is broken, there are festive activities in a lively atmosphere.
    • The karaoke bar maintained a lively atmosphere, even at such a late hour.
    • The town was a lively place, buzzing with activity.
    Example sentences
    • A bonus is the Reading Group Companion Section at the end of the novel, featuring 10 questions sure to stimulate a lively discussion of the book.
    • Thank you both very much for a spirited, lively, intelligent discussion.
    • However, it would be a foolish man who tried to dictate to three such lively and intelligent minds.

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Dato cultural del día

Spain's literary renaissance, known as the Golden Age (Siglo de Oro/i>), roughly covers the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It includes the Italian-influenced poetry of figures such as Garcilaso de la Vega; the religious verse of Fray Luis de León, Santa Teresa de Ávila and San Juan de la Cruz; picaresque novels such as the anonymous Lazarillo de Tormes and Quevedo's Buscón; Miguel de Cervantes' immortal Don Quijote; the theater of Lope de Vega, and the ornate poetry of Luis de Góngora.