Traducción de loosen en español:

loosen

Pronunciación: /ˈluːsn/

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • 1.1 (partially dislodge) [tooth] aflojar 1.2 (make less tight) [collar/knot/bolt] aflojar, soltar* I had to loosen my belt tuve que aflojarme el cinturón she loosened her grip on the steering wheel dejó de apretar con tanta fuerza el volante it loosens the bowels tiene efecto laxante 1.3 (make less compact) [soil] aflojar
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • The girl to our right, in complementary pinks and peach colors, lifts her face as she loosens the tight black collar around her neck.
    • She shook her head in acknowledgment, and went to Glory, loosening the tied reins.
    • His fingers threaded through her tight chignon and loosened it.

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

  • [knot/bolt] aflojarse, soltarse*
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • At the end of the holiday, I was starting to feel the knots in my shoulders loosen and my mind start to clear after all the drama and stress of the past few months.
    • Her head rested on his shoulder and her body loosened.
    • Amy's shoulders loosened and Hart gently trod back to sit quietly by her side.

Verbos con partícula

loosen up

verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio 1.1 (physically) entrar en calor 1.2 (emotionally) relajarse 1.1verb + object + adverb, verb + adverb + object/verbo + complemento + adverbio, verbo + adverbio + complemento 2.1 (physically) [muscles] desentumecer* 2.2 (emotionally) hacer* relajar

Definición de loosen en:

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Palabra del día sigla
f
abbreviation …
HECHO CULTURAL

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.