Traducción de microscopic en español:

microscopic

Pronunciación: /ˌmaɪkrəˈskɑːpɪk; ˌmaɪkrəˈskɒpɪk/

adjective/adjetivo

  • 1.1 (very small) [fragment/organism] microscópico, al microscopio
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • Seriously, it's an extremely small, microscopic number, and he probably won't notice.
    • It's an epic, but at the heart of it is an extremely detailed and microscopic view of human nature.
    • Is she flipping through a magazine and raving about a microscopic skirt?
    1.2 (meticulous) [examination/investigation] minucioso
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • With their entire season on the line, Munster would have planned their day in microscopic detail, yet all of their best intentions looked like turning to dust as early as the first 10 minutes.
    • Specific, sometimes microscopic, detail is used here, too, in a kind of a cinematic structure cutting back and forth between the two narratives.
    • And so, let me take this time to list a few of the many microscopic details that make ordinary day to day living worth it all for me.
    1.3 (with microscope) (before noun/delante del nombre) [examination] microscópico, al microscopio
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • Diarrhoea was defined as watery when the patient passed at least three loose stools per day without visible blood or microscopic red blood and polymorphonuclear cells in the specimen.
    • To their scientists, the visible snow is only a small part of all the settling material that is mostly microscopic and not visible to the naked eye.
    • They feed on microscopic blue green algae plants that only thrive in saline waters.

Definición de microscopic en:

Obtener más de Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribirse para eliminar anuncios y acceder a los recursos premium

Palabra del día sigla
f
abbreviation …
HECHO CULTURAL

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.