Traducción de neighborhood en español:

neighborhood

Pronunciación: /ˈneɪbərhʊd; ˈneɪbəhʊd/
, (British English/inglés británico) neighbourhood

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 (residential area) barrio (masculine); (before noun/delante del nombre) [school/policeman] del barrio, del vecindario neighborhood watch o (in American English also/en inglés norteamericano también) patrol[ vigilancia de una calle, barrio etc a cargo de sus propios habitantes ]
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • As well, family units sit within a neighbourhood and wider community of other families that identify with a common cause, that of a decent life with those we love.
    • Books were distributed in communities and neighbourhoods, and to family members and friends.
    • Different classes of people have long sorted themselves into neighborhoods within a city or region.
    1.2 (inhabitants) vecindario (masculine)
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • Social interactions based on neighbourhood have been deteriorating for decades - particularly in highly transitory urban areas.
    • Both sets of protagonists are torn between the American Dream of fame and fortune and the more comfortable pull to stay true to your station in life and neighbourhood.
    1.3 (vicinity) zona (feminine) in the neighborhood en los alrededores, en or por la zona in the neighborhood of $50,000 cerca de or alrededor de 50.000 dólares
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • Ottawa has shown it has considered the question about the neighbourhood surrounding Iraq no more than it has given any thought to the question inside Iraq.
    • The neighbourhood surrounding the Medical Academy was the biggest surprise as transactions there were few.
    • Wait a while and a map of west London will open up showing the precise location of the shot and all the other photos taken in the surrounding neighbourhood.

Definición de neighborhood en:

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Palabra del día sigla
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abbreviation …
HECHO CULTURAL

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.