Traducción de placement en español:

placement

Pronunciación: /ˈpleɪsmənt/

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 countable/numerable (in employment) colocación (feminine) the course included a year's placement with a company el curso incluía un año de prácticas en una empresa
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • It was amazing, she was immediately given a long-term temporary placement and has since had many others and is still working, even though she is now 69.
    • There is growing speculation that he will join a prestigious Scottish firm when he takes up a work experience placement in the City of London later this year.
    • One of the other days would be spent doing off-site vocational courses and the other would be spent on a work experience placement.
    1.2 c and u (positioning) colocación (feminine), ubicación (feminine) (especially Latin America/especialmente América Latina) (before noun/delante del nombre) placement test (American English/inglés norteamericano) test (masculine) de aptitud ([ para determinar qué curso se ha de seguir ])
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • Some students chose to continue with their placement despite the fact that CECS cancelled the credit for it.
    • But proper placement of such tracks is also important to him.
    • In that letter he stated the restrictions, ‘To facilitate proper work placement of this employee’.
    1.3 u and c (in tennis) tiro (masculine) 1.4 u and c [Finance] colocación (feminine)

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Palabra del día sigla
f
abbreviation …
HECHO CULTURAL

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.