Traducción de prisoner en español:

prisoner

Pronunciación: /ˈprɪznər; ˈprɪznə(r)/

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 (captive) prisionero, (masculine, feminine) he is a prisoner in his own house no se puede mover de casa he is a prisoner of his own ideology es prisionero de sus ideas he was held prisoner (by enemy forces) lo tuvieron prisionero (by kidnappers) lo tuvieron secuestrado to take sb prisoner tomar or (especially Spain/especialmente España) coger* a algn prisionero to take prisoners hacer* prisioneros to take no prisoners ejecutar a todos los cautivos
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • After conquering Troy, you will need to rescue some villagers that have been taken prisoner by an unknown enemy.
    • He had allowed his dear friend, his sister in Christ, to be taken prisoner by their enemies.
    • Taken prisoner, he was jailed and as a POW served time in Wakefield and Frongoch prisons.
    1.2 (in jail) preso, (masculine, feminine), recluso, (masculine, feminine) a prisoner of conscience un preso de conciencia 1.3 (person arrested) detenido, (masculine, feminine) 1.4 (accused) reo (masculine and feminine), acusado, (masculine, feminine)
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • A third of all inmates are remand prisoners who are awaiting trial or sentencing.
    • Certainly, the cost to society of convicted prisoners who commit further crimes as soon as they are released is a high one.
    • The cells are used to hold prisoners awaiting trial, or following conviction, pending transfer to a main prison.

Definición de prisoner en:

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Palabra del día sigla
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abbreviation …
HECHO CULTURAL

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.