Traducción de puff en español:

puff

Pronunciación: /pʌf/

noun/nombre

  • 2 uncountable/no numerable (breath) (British English/inglés británico) [colloquial/familiar], aliento (masculine) to run out of puff quedarse sin aliento
  • 3 countable/numerable [Cookery/Cocina] pastelito (masculine) de hojaldre, milhojas (masculine)
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • The wrapper may be plain bread dough but rich layered pastry is more characteristic, either filo or rough puff paste, made by the familiar sequence of buttering, folding, and rolling.
    • So does a wonderful dessert of fried plantain puffs centered with a pudding-like custard that's slightly sweet against the banana tartness.
    • There were chocolate cake, chocolate mouse, ice cream, crème caramel, cheesecake and custard puffs.
  • 4 countable/numerable (ornament) bullón (masculine) (before noun/delante del nombre) puff sleeves mangas (feminine plural) abombadas or abullonadas
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • Anyways, this sleeves of this dress are examples of ‘deflated puffs.’
    • You watch her too, you watch her all the time. You were there when she was nobody, in the days when she still wore frills and shoulder puffs and smiled that terribly shy smile you thought was beautiful.
    • I used a Sky Blue Bridal Satin for the main dress and White Bridal Satin with White Organza overlays as the skirt puffs and sleeves.
  • 5 countable/numerable (favorable comment) [colloquial/familiar] to give sth a puff darle* bombo a algo [colloquial/familiar]
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • Two musicians had enough puff left over after blowing their instruments to chase a thief who stole their band's collection bucket.
    • Scotland isn't very good at blowing its own trumpet, but luckily Tommy has puff to spare.
    • Defending himself Mr Stickley said: ‘I suffer from asthma and so I could not bring up enough puff for the test.’
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • Kate's publisher offers us two brief ‘reviews’, which most of us would call puffs, from other writers, and a link to a longer review in the New York Times.
    • It stemmed from 17th-cent. abstracts of books and comments on publishers' puffs.
    • The other two books were by British authors, both of them well known in the thriller genre, and both books had covers which carried enthusiastic puffs from big names.

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • 1 1.1 (blow) soplar don't puff cigarette smoke in my eyes no me eches el humo del cigarrillo a los ojos 1.2 (smoke) [cigarette/cigar/pipe] dar* chupadas or (in Latin America also/en América Latina también) pitadas or (in Spain also/en España también) caladas a 1.3 (say) what a lot of stairs, he puffed —¡cuántas escaleras! —dijo resoplando or bufando
  • 2 (praise) [colloquial/familiar] darle* bombo a [colloquial/familiar]

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

  • 1 1.1 (blow) soplar 1.2 (smoke) to puff on oat sth [on cigarette/cigar/pipe] dar* chupadas or (in Latin America also/en América Latina también) pitadas or (in Spain also/en España también) caladas a algo
  • 2 (pant) resoplar I puffed up the stairs subí las escaleras resoplando

Verbos con partícula

puff out

verb + object + adverb, verb + adverb + object/verbo + complemento + adverbio, verbo + adverbio + complemento (expand) [cheeks] inflar, hinchar (Spain/España) ; [feathers] erizar* 1.1verb + object + adverb/verbo + complemento + adverbio (make out of breath) (British English/inglés británico) [colloquial/familiar], dejar sin aliento, dejar echando los bofes [colloquial/familiar]

puff up

verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio (swell) hincharse 1.1verb + object + adverb, verb + adverb + object/verbo + complemento + adverbio, verbo + adverbio + complemento (inflate) (British English/inglés británico) [colloquial/familiar], inflar, hinchar (Spain/España)

Definición de puff en:

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game …
HECHO CULTURAL

Did you know that the primary meaning of almuerzo is lunch? It is used only in this sense in most of Latin America. In Spain and Mexico, where comida is the usual word for lunch, almuerzo can also be a mid-morning snack.