Traducción de reject en español:

reject

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

/rɪˈdʒekt/
  • 1.1 [suggestion/offer/application/candidate] rechazar*, no aceptar the machine rejects damaged coins la máquina no acepta las monedas en mal estado the appeal was rejected [Law/Derecho] el recurso de apelación fue denegado or rechazado or desestimado to feel rejected sentirse* rechazado
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • 54.87 per cent of French voters reject the European Union's new constitution.
    • Kelly, the US officials said, rejected the threat as unacceptable as a means to resolve the nuclear crisis.
    • The Palestinians have rejected the release as inadequate and want thousands freed.
    1.2 (turn against) rechazar*
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • In several studies, women emphasized wanting to satisfy a partner's needs, promote intimacy, avoid tension in a relationship, and avoid rejecting a partner.
    • Her rejecting him only made his desire to gain her affection that much stronger.
    • This might eventually cause others to reject the depressed person and to avoid future interactions.
    1.3 [Medicine/Medicina] [tissue/organ] rechazar*
    Más ejemplos en oraciones
    • A mix of immunosuppressive therapies is typically used to prevent a recipient's body from rejecting a transplanted organ.
    • In many instances, bodies reject transplant organs because their immune systems see them as foreign tissue.
    • Immunosuppressants interfere with the body's immune system - making it less capable of rejecting the transplanted kidney.

noun/nombre

/ˈriːdʒekt/
  • 1.1 (flawed product) artículo (masculine)( or producto (masculine) etc) defectuoso (before noun/delante del nombre) reject shop tienda (feminine) de artículos defectuosos 1.2 (person) a reject of society un marginado social or de la sociedad

Definición de reject en:

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Palabra del día sigla
f
abbreviation …
HECHO CULTURAL

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.