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transition

Pronunciación: /trænˈzɪʃən; trænˈzɪʃən; trɑːn-/

Traducción de transition en español:

noun/nombre

u and c
  • 1.1 (change) transición (feminine) a period/time of transition un período/una época de transición to be in a state of transition estar* en estado de transición transition from sth to sth transición (feminine)de algo a algo the transition from dictatorship to democracy la transición de la dictadura a la democracia he successfully made the transition from monastic to secular life pasó de la vida monástica a la secular sin problemas (before noun/delante del nombre) [period/stage] de transición transition element [Chemistry/Química] elemento (masculine) de transición
    Example sentences
    • The situationists only wanted what could never exist, never accepting a period of transition, a process of change.
    • He skilfully dissects the complex and varied forms of the labour process during periods of transition.
    • For these other countries, postcommunism designates the period of transition and radical democratic changes that followed the end of communist rule.
    1.2 [Music/Música] transición (feminine)
    Example sentences
    • I was bowled over by the energy of the Seventh Symphony which has a lovely transition in the First Movement and a dreamy Allegretto reminding one of hallowed antiquity.
    • In a telling transition from B minor to F major, Delius calms the troubled man.
    • A quick transition to the major tonality provides sunshine.

Definición de transition en:

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Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.