Dictionary search results

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-le1 US English

Forming names of appliances or instruments

LE US English

Language engineering

-le2 US English

Forming nouns having or originally having a diminutive sense

-le3 US English

(Forming adjectives from an original verb) apt to; liable to

-le4 US English

Forming verbs, chiefly those expressing repeated action or movement (as in babble, dazzle), or having diminutive sense (as in nestle)

Le Chatelier's principle US English

A principle stating that if a constraint (such as a change in pressure, temperature, or concentration of a reactant) is applied to a system in equilibrium, the equilibrium will shift so as to tend to counteract the effect of the constraint

Le Corbusier US English

(1887–1965), French architect and city planner, born in Switzerland; born Charles Édouard Jeanneret. A pioneer of the international style, he developed theories on functionalism, the use of new materials and industrial techniques, and a modular system of standard-sized units (Modulor)

Le Havre US English

A port in northern France, on the English Channel at the mouth of the Seine River; population 185,311 (2006)

Le Mans US English

An industrial city in northwestern France; population 148,169 (2006). It is the site of a race car track on which a 24-hour endurance race, established in 1923, is held each summer

Morgan le Fay US English

(In Arthurian legend) an enchantress, sister of King Arthur

tout le monde US English

Everyone

Le Fanu New Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors

, Joseph Sheridan (1814–73), Irish novelist

Le Carré New Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors

, John (b.1931), English novelist; pseudonym of David John Moore Cornwell

Le Nôtre New Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors

, André (1613–1700), French landscape gardener

Le Corbusier New Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors

(1887–1965), French architect; born Charles Édouard Jeanneret

Le Carré, John US English

(1931-), English novelist; pseudonym of David John Moore Cornwell. His unromanticized and thoughtful spy novels, which often feature British agent George Smiley, include The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1963), Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy (1974), and A Most Wanted Man (2008)

Le Guin, Ursula US English

(1929-), US writer; full name Ursula Kroeber Le Guin. Her science fiction includes five Earthsea novels for children (1968–2001) and the Hainish Cycle novels, which include Rocannon’s World (1966) and The Left Hand of Darkness (1969)

Le Nôtre, André US English

(1613–1700), French landscape gardener. He designed many formal gardens, including the parks of Vaux-le-Vicomte and Versailles

Le Verrier, Urbain US English

(1811–77), French mathematician. His analysis of the motions of the planets suggested that an unknown body was disrupting the orbit of Uranus. Le Verrier prompted the German astronomer Johann Galle (1812–1910) to investigate, and the planet Neptune was discovered in 1846

d'Alembert, Jean le Rond US English

(1717–83), French mathematician, physicist, and philosopher. His most famous work was the Traité de dynamique (1743), in which he developed his own laws of motion. From 1746 to 1758 he was Diderot’s chief collaborator on the Encyclopédie

Le Fanu, Joseph Sheridan US English

(1814–73), Irish novelist. He is best known for his stories of mystery, suspense, and the supernatural, such as The House by the Churchyard (1861) and Uncle Silas (1864)

metro New Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors

underground railway system; Le Métro Paris underground

réveillon US English

(In France and French-speaking countries) a night-time celebration, especially a feast traditionally held after midnight on Christmas morning

Le Réveillon in réveillon US English

(In France and French-speaking countries) a night-time celebration, especially a feast traditionally held after midnight on Christmas morning

Tartuffe New Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors

religious hypocrite; Le Tartuffe play by Molière (1669)

forecastle US English

The forward part of a ship below the deck, traditionally used as the crew’s living quarters

fo'c's'le in forecastle US English

The forward part of a ship below the deck, traditionally used as the crew’s living quarters

Le Marche in Marche US English

A region of east central Italy, between the Apennines and the Adriatic Sea; capital, Ancona. Italian name Le Marche

le Chatelier in Le Chatelier's principle US English

A principle stating that if a constraint (such as a change in pressure, temperature, or concentration of a reactant) is applied to a system in equilibrium, the equilibrium will shift so as to tend to counteract the effect of the constraint

le Douanier in Rousseau, Henri US English

(1844–1910), French painter; known as le Douanier (“customs officer”); full name Henri Julien Rousseau. After retiring as a customs official in 1893, he created bold, colorful paintings of fantastic dreams and exotic jungle landscapes

le Douanier in Rousseau New Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors

Henri (Julien) (1844–1910), French painter; known as le Douanier (‘customs officer’)

LeMay, Curtis Emerson US English

(1906–90), US air force officer; full name Curtis Emerson LeMay; known as Old Iron Pants. During World War II, he conducting a massive bombing campaign against Japan. After directing the Berlin Airlift in 1948, he was the commanding general of the US Strategic Air Command 1948–57 and Air Force chief of staff 1961–65


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